Large-format Tile – January 2018

Polished concrete floor renovation needs self-leveling treatment for large-format porcelain install

MAPEI products minimize impact of flooring installation in Indiana Greek Orthodox church

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church sits on a 20-acre (8,09-hectare) site in Carmel, Ind. It was the first church to be constructed in the Triad Byzantine style since the Hagia Sophia, which was built more than 1,400 years ago. The church design includes a dome with a diameter of 55 feet (16,8 m) that was built and raised up from the ground, bronze doors weighing 600 pounds (272 kg) each at the grand entrance, and the ability to accommodate more than 600 worshippers.

Because the expression of creative beauty within the Greek Orthodox Church’s places of worship is a major tenet of the Church, the members of Holy Trinity decided to have the floors and some vertical spaces dressed in tile and stone. CJK Design Group specified large-format 24” x 24” (61 x 61 cm) and 12” x 24” (30 x 61 cm) porcelain tiles from Daltile’s Diamante, San Michele and Continental Slate series for the narthex, nave and sanctuary.

But when the church was built eight years previously, the floors were finished in polished concrete that produced a nonporous, sealed surface that did not offer the proper finish for the installation. Traditional shot blasting could not be used for surface preparation because of the deleterious effect that it could have on the painted frescoes and delicate icons, which were created with a centuries-old process using egg tempera paints.

Innovative technology produced a solution that circumvented tradition and provided a breathtaking foundation to anchor the beauty that lines the walls and ceilings of the narthex, nave, sanctuary and ambulatory at Holy Trinity.

Preparing the subfloor

Installers from Indianapolis-based Starnet contractor Certified Floorcovering Services (CFS) used MAPEI’s ECO Prim Grip primer to cover the polished concrete surface, eliminating the need to shot blast and potentially damage the church’s painted treasures. Next, the crew tested and used Ultraplan LSC – a MAPEI self-leveling liquid skimcoat – to patch and smooth all floor surfaces, again reducing dust worries. The crew also used Mapelastic CI liquid-rubber membrane for crack isolation in the concrete flooring. During the first three weeks of work, the church still held services in the nave.

Once the floors were prepared, the CFS installation crews worked meticulously to the architects’ plans. The crews transitioned between varied types of porcelain tiles and marble to produce a look that complemented and accented the intricate icons and frescoes. The large-format 24” x 24” (61 x 61 cm) and 12” x 24” (30 x 61 cm) Daltile porcelain tiles for the narthex, nave and sanctuary were set with Ultraflex LFT mortar and then grouted with Ultracolor Plus FA.

In addition to porcelain tiles, red “Rojo Alicante” marble tiles were set as borders and for transitions between the white porcelain tiles. The marble tiles were set with Kerapoxy 410 100%-solids epoxy mortar; these tiles were also grouted with Ultracolor Plus FA. The CFS crews hand-cut many of the Rojo Alicante tiles to fit around existing structures in the church and so that they could tile a number of vertical elevations in the floor.

In the narthex and nave, the crews set four prefabricated mosaic medallions that continued the iconography from the walls to the floor. The crews first used Mapecem Quickpatch concrete patch and Ultraplan Easy self-leveling underlayment to patch and level the substrate beneath the medallions. Then, the crews set the medallions in place with Ultraflex LFT.

The installers also set Daltile Keystone glass mosaic tiles along the inner walls of the baptistery, and they interspersed Glass Horizons mosaic tiles with Crema Marfil marble pillars on the baptistery’s exterior. After waterproofing the baptistery with Mapelastic AquaDefense membrane, installers used Adesilex P10 glass tile mortar to set the mosaics.

Mapesil T sealant was used to fill all expansion joints and soft joints where vertical and horizontal tiled surfaces met.

Innovation and determination bolstered the flooring contractor’s efforts to successfully complete the beautification of Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church. Because CFS was so proud of its work, it entered the project in the Starnet Design Awards; the company won the Silver Award for the 2017 Unique Installation Challenge.

 

 

 

 

Member Spotlight – January 2018 – H.J. Martin and Son

H.J. Martin and Son
Green Bay, Wis.
www.hjmartin.com

Lots of good things get their start in the garage. Bands, science projects, and in this case the company now known as H.J. Martin and Son, founded when Henry John Martin began selling paint and tile out of the family garage in 1931.  Eighty-six years later H.J. Martin and Son is a multi-divisional specialty contractor, self-performing commercial and residential flooring, walls and ceilings, glass and glazing, doors and hardware, and fixture and millwork installation nationwide.

The company’s diversity helps it cross-train its installers and helps to retain top talent. If one department is slow and another is busy, it can readily adjust. The company also can offer package discounts to the general contractor or end user on multiple phases of a project.

The contractor gets great satisfaction from the entire process of contracting, from showroom to installation, and the customer’s excitement about the final result.

“We go to great lengths to maintain an extensive selection of tile products within our two showrooms,” said David Martin, the 4th generation of H.J. Martin and Son. “Many of these tiles are exclusive to H.J. Martin and Son, so we often will have customers travel a great distance to purchase from us.”

H.J. Martin and Son prides itself on its team of in-house designers, who have detailed knowledge of its tile products, and are experts at finding the right fit for each individual client.

“We have long believed the thing that sets us apart from other tile contractors is our highly experienced team of installers,” David Martin said. “They are true artisans, who continue to train on the newest installation processes.

“All of our people, from designers to installers, try to delight our customers with an exceptional tile experience to last a lifetime.”

H.J. Martin and Son specializes in ceramic tile and natural stone for both residences and commercial projects. On the residential side, the company displays a wide variety of tile and stone products within its two showrooms and employs a team of aforementioned 14 in-house designers who help guide the client to the perfect tile or stone for his or her home. And company installers are experienced with a popular in-floor electric heating/uncoupling system

The commercial division installs tile and stone in office and government buildings, automobile dealer showrooms, educational and healthcare facilities, hospitality spaces and retail locations, among other places.

In addition, H.J. Martin and Son has an in-house team of floor-care specialists. They are experts at ceramic and natural stone cleaning, sealing and restoration, along with grout cleaning, sealing and recoloring. If a new tile floor is not an option, refreshing existing flooring is a great option.

Since H.J. Martin and Son strives to deliver quality products and installation to all of its customers, it joined NTCA in July 2014, with the belief that existing and potential customers will see its NTCA Five Star affiliation and know that they are receiving the highest quality of installation available.

“As a company, we believe strongly in continuing education for our installers, designers and other flooring specialists,” Martin said. “We always strive for our people to be knowledgeable in the latest product advances and installation techniques through attendance at outside seminars or in-house training sessions. We believe that the mission of the NTCA embodies many of the same ideals.

“NTCA membership, particularly as a recognized Five Star Contractor, assures clients that they are receiving the highest quality of workmanship for ceramic tile and natural stone,” he added. “Having the NTCA member designation helps to communicate our expertise level to those outside the company.”

Although the company does not currently have Certified Tile Installers or ACT-certified installers on staff, more than 80% of its in-house installers are Journeymen and have completed the requisite four-year apprenticeship.

Qualified Labor – January 2018 – Sark Tile supports education by hosting NTCA Workshop and CTI exam

Sark Tile, based in Lincoln, Neb., hosted NTCA Tile & Stone Workshop in October 2017. This is a groundbreaking event, since it’s the first NTCA Workshop ever hosted in Lincoln.

But perhaps it should come as no surprise. Sark Tile has been committed to educating the tile industry in its area for over 20 years. Since Mark Becher founded Sark Tile in 1999, he has been working to educate his clients.

As a national distributor of tile and tile installation products, Sark Tile serves a range of clients from architects to the end consumer, offering an exceptional platform to reach a broad range of people within the industry. Sark Tile took advantage of this platform by hosting the October Workshop, and subsequently, a Certified Tile Installer (CTI) test the next month.

The October NTCA Workshop titled, “Failures, Could it be Me?” was a great opportunity to bring in an expert, NTCA Training Director Mike Heinlein, to show local installers, designers, and clients how to avoid common installation mistakes. The event was described as eye opening and a brilliant refresher, even for a seasoned installer. For those who weren’t as well versed with the tile installation process, it was a first-rate opportunity to learn the correct way to perform basic techniques.

Heinlein began the workshop with a slideshow presentation outlining some common tile installation failures and how to avoid them. The diverse group of attendees was provided a superb opportunity for questions and discussion. Installers raised discussion about hurdles they have to overcome, and designers talked about their struggles. “It was apparent education on all sides of the project would solve most of these issues,” said Dan Hecox, NTCA State Ambassador for Nebraska and Regional Evaluator for the
CTI test.

Sark Tile staff (l. to r.): Katie Danehey, Serina Buchanan, NTCA’s Mark Heinlein, Mark Becher, Brian Glory, John Cury and Faith Allen Peck.

After a quick break for some networking and delicious food, Heinlein finished the workshop with some hands-on demonstrations. This portion of the workshop was an excellent chance to physically show attendees why it is so important to do things correctly, and what the outcome can be if they aren’t. Attendees walked away with many tricks of the trade.

The layout of Sark Tile was ideal for this presentation, with a beautiful showroom for the discussion and a spacious working area in the warehouse for the hands-on demonstration.

Sark Tile’s warehouse was also an outstanding location for the CTI event they hosted in November. With the help of CTI Regional Evaluator, Dan Hecox, local installers were able to test their skills.

Sark Tile hosted the first CTI test in Lincoln, Neb. in November.

Kate Danehey, office manager from Sark Tile, expressed the company philosophy that the health of the industry relies on installers.

“If we have installers out there incorrectly installing our products resulting in failures, the first finger is almost always pointed at the material which is almost never the case,” Danehey said. “Proper preparation combined with the correct setting materials and tools lead to a faster and more profitable install. Consumer’s confidence – and perception that the install will be smooth – is of paramount importance when trying to make a sale, which is why these testing events are so important. The more skilled installers we have in the area, the more likely people will be to use tile in the future for additional projects.”

Sark Tile owner Mark Becher is committed to education and bringing workshops, like this one from NTCA to the local tile trade in Lincoln.

Sark Tile also hosted Lincoln’s first NTCA workshop in October 2017.

 

 

A group of Sark employees ready for the CTI test to be held at the company warehouse, with (from right) Scott Carothers, CTEF; Dan Hecox, NTCA Nebraska State Ambassador and Mark Becher, Sark Tile owner.

Tech Talk – January 2018

The TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass and Stone Tile Installation

By The CTEF Blog

This article is the first of three articles that examine, explore and explain the documents and publications essential to the health of our industry: The TCNA Handbook, the ANSI Standards and the NTCA Reference Manual.

If you spend time with anyone involved in the proper installation of ceramic tile, the TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass, and Stone Tile Installation will be the focal point of the conversation. Why? Because this useful guide assists in clarifying and standardizing installation specifications for tile.

In addition to providing a selection of numbered installation “methods” for differentiating and easy reference, the Handbook includes various product selection guides for ceramic, glass, and stone tiles; guidelines for wet areas; field and installation requirements, and more.

Produced by the Tile Council of North America (TCNA), the TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass, and Stone Tile Installation has been published on a continuous basis since 1963.

Here’s an overview:

First, what is the TCNA?

Tile Council of North America is a trade association representing manufacturers of ceramic tile, tile installation materials, tile equipment, raw materials, and other tile-related products. It was established in 1945 as the Tile Council of America (TCA). In 2003, it became TCNA reflecting how its membership has expanded to include all of North America.

Tile Council is recognized for its leadership role in facilitating the development of North American and international industry quality standards to benefit tile consumers.

Additionally, TCNA regularly conducts independent research and product testing, works with regulatory, trade, and other government agencies, offers professional training, and publishes industry-consensus guidelines and standards, economic reports, and promotional literature.

One of the highlights of the yearly Coverings show is hearing TCNA Executive Director Eric Astrachan review the state of the ceramic tile industry – from an economic perspective as well as from a creative and trend perspective in North America.

TCNA also strongly supports the mission of the Ceramic Tile Education Foundation.

What is the TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass, and Stone Tile Installation?

The TCNA website describes the Handbook as follows:

“A guide to assist in clarifying and standardizing installation specifications for tile. Each installation recommendation, or method, requires a properly designed, constructed, and prepared substructure using materials and construction techniques that meet nationally recognized material and construction standards. Included are: product selection guides for ceramic, glass, and stone tiles; guidelines for wet areas; ISO mortar and grout specifications; information on substrate flatness requirements; information on grout joint sizes and patterns, and workmanship standards excerpted from ANSI installation standards.”

The TCNA Handbook provides installation methods from which to choose, based on the requirements of the installation or the types of applications in which they may be used.

For example, will the tile be installed inside or outside? In a wet area such as a shower or steam room? Or in a dry area such as an entry foyer? Each method includes a generic drawing that shows each component or material required as you can see in the image below, which addresses installing stone floor tile.

How is the Handbook organized?

The TCNA Handbook works hand-in-hand with the ANSI Specifications to provide tile installations that are proven to stand the test of time.

In addition to detailing tile installation methods for ceramic and glass tile and natural stone tile, the Handbook includes:

  • Product selection guides for ceramic tile, glass tile, natural stone tile, setting materials, grout, backer board, membrane, additional products and Green Building
  • Field and installation requirements (i.e., substrate requirements, lighting, mortar and mortar coverage, flatness and lippage, grout joint size and pattern considerations, finished tilework, accessibility and wet areas guidelines)
  • Floor tiling installation guide
  • Environmental exposure classifications
  • Using the TCNA Handbook for specification writing
  • Installer and contractor qualifications guide
  • EJ171 Movement Joint Guidelines for Ceramic, Glass and Stone
  • Appendices and method locators

Each tile installation method details:

  • Recommended uses
  • Service rating
  • Environmental exposure classifications
  • Typical weight of tile installation
  • Limitations
  • Membrane options
  • Requirements
  • Materials (including for Green/Sustainable design)
  • Preparation by other trades
  • Movement joint requirements
  • Installation specifications
  • Notes
The evolution of the TCNA Handbook

The Handbook is truly a living, breathing entity that evolves in lock-step with the tile industry. As new products get introduced – for example, new tile formats and new mortars and tools to support those formats – new installations methods quickly follow to ensure best practices.

As a result, the Handbook has increased in size. A press release detailing changes in the 2017 issue includes the following:

  • The new sections “Tile Layout Considerations” and “System Modularity” are geared more toward those involved in tile selection and design. As an example of the various revisions to Handbook existing language, (Astrachan) noted the further explanation this year of substrate flatness requirements, which (he) calls “essential but too-often ignored.”
  • A prime example is the new Handbook section to address the newer type of steel studs commonly referred to as “equivalent gauge” or “EQ” studs. The new Handbook language helps people understand the most important considerations for avoiding tile problems when these thinner studs are used. Stephanie Samulski, Handbook Committee Secretary and Technical Content Manager, noted that “the specific design criteria that are ultimately needed will likely get hashed out in ANS.”
  • Other noteworthy changes that 2017 Handbook users will see include significantly more information on how to avoid the undesirable effects of wall-wash lighting on tile installations, new “Visual Inspection of Tilework” and “Design Considerations When Specifying Tile” sections, significant changes to the EJ171 movement joint guidelines, and a new method for tiling an exterior deck or balcony over unoccupied space (tile and stone versions).
What makes the Handbook unique?

The Handbook comes to life each year thanks to the Handbook Committee that includes representatives from the entire tile industry and all those touched by the tile industry – backer board, mortar, grout, membrane, tile and more manufacturers, industry associations, standards groups, construction specification groups and regional groups. It’s a balanced assembly of stakeholder voters that comes together to prioritize and address topics of concern.

The TCNA Handbook Committee determines Handbook content through significant group discussion and consensus efforts, and through meetings in person biennially and more frequently in workgroups.

As Astrachan explained, “The Handbook is a vehicle for providing industry consensus, but it’s not a standard and therefore not set up like one, enabling the committee to provide information in non-mandatory language when needed. It’s a particularly useful means of addressing conflicting recommendations or specifications, as can easily occur when a producer or another trade makes a major shift in product or practice in a way that impacts tile installations.”

Proposals for changes, often referred to as “submissions,” are welcome from any individual or organization.

Would you like to become involved in the TCNA Handbook?

All Handbook meetings are open to non-members, who are encouraged to participate in the discussions. If you would like to become involved, you can find meeting dates and locations posted on TCNAtile.com.

January 2018 Feature Story – MAPEI

Anaha® (which means “reflection of light” in Hawaiian) is a magnificent new condominium complex on the island of Oahu. Made of concrete, glass and steel, it is part of the Ward Village master-planned community near Kewalo Harbor in Honolulu. This new luxury high-rise was planned by Howard Hughes Corporation and designed by architects Solomon Cordwell Buenz of Chicago and Ben Woo Architects of Honolulu. The interiors were designed by global design leader Woods Bagot Interiors.

The complex is composed of the Anaha Tower, housing eight residences per floor plus penthouses on Levels 36-38, as well as the Podium townhouses and flats, which occupy the first six floors and extend from the tower. The roof of the Podium (adjacent to the seventh floor of the tower) hosts an amazing selection of indoor and outdoor activity areas, including a cantilevered pool that extends 13 feet beyond the building’s edge and features a glass bottom.

The LEED Platinum building was designed with the environment in mind – harmonizing with sea, sky and mountains. The exterior of the entrance area sports a “living wall” of plants and water elements framed with lava stone veneer that surround tile walkways forming the signature “W” for Ward Village. The interior of Anaha is just as awe-inspiring, with floor-to-ceiling windows that open every residence to views of the Pacific Ocean or the Honolulu skyline. Some expanses even look out toward the historic Diamond Head landmark.

Floor and wall coverings received all manner of treatments, including stone and stone veneer in public areas indoors and out; (at the owner’s option) carpet, wood and tile in living spaces; stone and tile in bathrooms of the residences; and resilient floor coverings in service areas.

The Hawaii branch of A-American Custom
Flooring, Inc. (a member of the Tile Contractors Association of Hawaii), was in charge of all aspects of the tile installations for interior and exterior walls, floors and specialty elements with the exception of the interior tile walls of the pool on the amenities deck. Their installers also handled moisture mitigation work and installation of wood, carpet and resilient floor coverings. A-American worked closely with General Contractor A. C. Kobayashi, Inc., to complete all the aspects of the installations on schedule, including the mega-challenge of zero tolerance in transitions between flooring types.

Zero tolerance transitions moisture mitigation and waterproofing

Anaha’s 236-unit residence tower and 81 townhomes and flats were architecturally designed with a zero tolerance scheme for all finishes in the flooring landscape of the building. From interior to exterior, zero tolerance requirements meant that all transitions could hold no change in height from tile to wood to carpet to resilients, to respect accessibility for disabled persons according to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

This zero tolerance created building and flooring challenges that were met by a wide variety of MAPEI’s concrete repair and flooring installation systems products for construction, surface preparation and floor-covering solutions. The fast-track schedule of the 38-story tower and the six-story podium required coordination and solutions for arising jobsite problems involving moisture mitigation and slab deformation involving post-tension concrete pours.

A-American used MAPEI’s Planiseal VS alkali-resistant, epoxy moisture-reduction barrier for moisture mitigation throughout the complex. Planiseal VS expedites floor-covering installations by eliminating the traditional wait time required for new concrete slabs to reach moisture levels suitable for installations. After the concrete surface was properly profiled, the Planiseal VS was poured to cover each level in the building.

After moisture mitigation, the floors were primed with one of three primers – Primer L, Primer T or ECO Prim Grip – where appropriate. Then the installers selected two MAPEI self-leveling underlayments – Novoplan® 2 Plus and Ultraplan® 1 Plus – to use in appropriate areas in order to produce a smooth, level surface for installing tiles and stone. Both of these products are quick-setting, self-leveling underlayments and repair mixes for interior concrete and engineer-approved floors.

MAPEI’s Mapelastic cementitious membrane was used for waterproofing and protecting exterior horizontal and vertical concrete spaces, while Mapelastic AquaDefense with Reinforcing Fabric, an advanced liquid-rubber, extremely quick-drying waterproofing and crack-isolation membrane, was used on interior surfaces before the tile and stone installations. Mapelastic AquaDefense dries after about 30 to 50 minutes and is then ready to receive any MAPEI polymer or epoxy mortar.

Range of mortars and grouts meet varying project demands

Installation of exterior and interior tile and stone also used a variety of MAPEI’s mortars and grouts. For the ultimate bond, Lava Stone Veneer pavers and curbs surrounding the building were installed with MAPEI’s two-part Kerabond/Keralastic system – a premium dry-set mortar that is combined with a flexible acrylic latex additive.

Where there was a need for speed, the A-American crews used the Granirapid® fast-curing system. Outdoor walls and benches that used Lava Stone Veneer and Cremino Stone Veneer in all sizes from mosaics to large-format tile were also installed with these two systems. All of these installations were grouted with MAPEI’s powerful Ultracolor® Plus FA – an ultra-premium, fine aggregate, fast-setting, polymer-modified, color-consistent, non-shrinking, efflorescence-free grout that can fill joint widths from 1/16” to 3/4”.

In the residences and townhouses, tile and stone played a dramatic role as field tile and accents on floors and walls. Types and brands included Caesarstone for countertops; Atlas Concorde floor tile in Seastone Greige and floor, wall and door accent tiles in Black for residences and public areas; Marmi porcelain wall tile in “Thassos”; Natural Stone Design’s porcelain floor and wall tile in Dark, Basaltina, plus mosaic tiles of the same material for residences and public spaces; Daltile’s quarry tile in Arid Gray for laundry rooms in residences; “Luce Glass” glass wall tile from North Shore for public restrooms; Ann Sacks’ 2” x 8” “INCA” brushed aluminum tiles for kitchen backsplashes; stone tiles in travertine, basalt, tundra stone and granite; “Nublado Light” and “Walnut Brown” wall base tiles from Stone Source; and many additional tile and stone selections that were optional for residents at time of purchase.

All interior tile and stone was installed with MAPEI’s thixotropic mortar, Ultraflex™ LFT. This mortar has a high content of unique dry polymer, resulting in excellent adhesion to the substrate and tile and is formulated with Easy Glide Technology™ for ease of application. Both wall and floor tiles were grouted with Keracolor® S (sanded) and Keracolor U (unsanded) grouts from MAPEI’s grout color collections. The quarry tiles in laundry rooms and in the kitchen and prep rooms on the Amenities level were grouted with Kerapoxy CQ. This grout uses a proprietary aggregate to achieve its durable color, making it excellent for countertops, high-traffic areas, and areas needing stain and chemical resistance. Easy to maintain, Kerapoxy CQ will clean to the original color and contains BioBlock® technology to help protect against mold and mildew.

High anxiety?

The A-American installers performed exceptionally well with the many different types of installations in many different parts of the project, but they truly excelled on the installation of the tile on the inside and outside of the cantilevered leisure/lap pool extension on the Amenities level. Working on a crane that lifted them seven stories into the air, the crew set sheets of black glass mosaic tiles on the interior and exterior sides of the glass-bottomed portion of the pool that extends 13 feet out from the building. They used MAPEI’s Adesilex P10 bright white, multipurpose thin-set mortar formulated with non-sag properties to set the tiles. The Adesilex P10 was mixed with Keraply for increased performance in a submerged installation. After removing the protective cover sheets, the tiles were grouted with Ultracolor Plus FA.

A total of 40 different products supplied by MAPEI – from substrate preparation to installation of all types of finished flooring – allowed the owners, architects, general contractors and installers, the peace of mind of sourcing all their needs from a single manufacturer to create a true island beauty.

Business Tip – January 2018

Cyber Insurance: can you afford to ignore it?

If you’re in business, here are five reasons why you really do need cyber insurance

By Marc Rosenkrantz, Schechner-Lifson Corporation

Think identity theft and cyber crime can’t happen to you? Think again. Read on for reasons cyber insurance protects you, your business and your customers.

1. Everyone has and uses a computer

Cyber insurance (also known as cyber liability insurance) was unheard of 15 years ago. Today, it’s as necessary as worker’s comp. If you lived in a flood plain would you not purchase flood insurance?

If you rely on a computer – in any way – to run your business, you need cyber insurance. Consider what would happen if your computer was hacked, and someone gained access to the private information of all of your customers, including their credit card details? Even if you do not do credit card transactions, your data is at risk.

The fallout could put any operation out of business, which is especially scary given hacking is a significant and real risk.

2. You don’t have an IT department or a risk management team

Big corporations can have whole departments dedicated to creating policies and action plans, which deal with potential risks, including cyber crime. If you’re a small or even a medium-sized business, chances are you don’t have a risk management team.

A good cyber insurance policy bridges the gap for businesses that don’t have the luxury of a risk management team. Many carriers offer preventive guidelines and services that will help reduce the chance of a cyber attack. In addition, they will be there to provide the necessary people and specialists and more importantly supply the funds should you have a breach.

3. Your general liability policy will not cover cyber crime

Most general liability policies do not include losses incurred due to the Internet. A comprehensive cyber insurance policy fills this important gap.

You might be wondering why a general liability policy doesn’t cover you for cyber-related injury. A general liability policy covers your legal liability for 3rd party property damage and personal injury. This means someone needs to be identified as responsible for the loss, and some physical damage needs to occur.

As electronic data is not considered to be “physical property”, it cannot be physically damaged. Cyber insurance offers tailored coverage for your business for 1st party and 3rd party losses, breaches to the Privacy Act and loss of profits following the insured event.

4. You may be responsible for data, even if you use a 3rd party cloud provider

If you have information stored on a cloud database, you may be surprised to know that in many cases, you are still legally responsible for how this information is handled.  Your 3rd party vendor has very little protection for you, and at the end of the day it is your responsibility to get a problem fixed and pay for the damages.

This is why it is important to read the fine print of your cloud hosting contracts. If you do find that your cloud provider is not responsible for mistakes or breaches to your data, at least you are protected.

5. It’s affordable

Securing a cyber liability policy doesn’t have to break your budget. With the right broker, such as NTCA Affiliate Member Schechner Lifson Corp., and partner insurers, you can secure affordable coverage that will provide the level of protection that is needed in today’s fast-paced world.

In fact, Schechner Lifson Corp., has been helping NTCA members for years for cyber security issues and a range of other business-related issues as well. For instance, Marci Miller of Infinity Floors recently praised the work of this company and its staff:

“I have been a member of NTCA for several years,” Miller said. “We take advantage of our annual rebates, we learn from the newsletters and TileLetter, on a few occasions we have even called and spoken with someone for technical support regarding installation.

“Recently we experienced the most valuable benefit of all. We were having a terrible issue with our workman’s comp – that is a problem that can cripple any tile contractor,” she added. “We had a broker who was completely useless and refused to help. I contacted NTCA to see if there was a comp policy or agency available to members. I was given the name of Schechner Lifson Corp. I called and was put in contact with Roseanne Gedman. We stayed with the same insurer, but had Schechner Lifson become our broker. Roseanne has worked with me and has been amazing! They are extremely professional and understand the market and the client’s needs. I highly recommend them to all NTCA
members.”

Schechner Lifson Corporation is a large regional insurance and financial company, based in New Jersey. Its mission is to provide superior insurance and financial services to customers through a diverse, highly creative and intellectual staff of over 40 associates who have the unique capacity to deliver a total insurance and investment program to customers. As both broker and agent, Schechner Lifson Corporation writes all forms of property and casualty coverage, life and group insurance, supplemental compensation plans, business continuation programs and qualified plans. For more information, contact Marc Rosenkrantz, CRM, CIC, AAI, President, Schechner Lifson Corporation, (w) 908-598-7813, (c) 973-766-3914 or email
[email protected]

Ask the Experts – January 2018

QUESTION

I’m having issue with glass tile for one our customers. We’re trying to determine what’s causing the cracking. I believe it might be due to the thinset shrinking. Is it possible that it may be the tile?

ANSWER

Yes, it is possible that the glass cracking could be due to thinset shrinkage as it cures, especially if the maximum bond coat thickness of the thinset was exceeded. But looking at the two photos you sent, here are my guesses.

In the first photo that includes the glass door and hinge, it appears that the glass may potentially have cracked from:

  • over-tightening of the screw through the hinge
  • a minor misalignment of the hole drilled in the glass to accept the screw
  • weight of the door on the fastener at the pressure point if all components of the door installation were not properly aligned or balanced.

In the second photo showing the closeup of the grout joint, it is difficult to know what caused these small fractures. The photo is taken too close to see a context of the location in the shower. It appears that the photo was taken very close to the glass and the fractures are fairly small. My guess is the fractures may have been in the tile at the time it was installed and they weren’t noticed by the installer.

If you need a solid determination of these fractures, a third party consultant that can make an onsite evaluation may be needed.

I hope this helps.

Mark Heinlein – CTI #1112, NTCA Training Director, Technical Trainer / Presenter

QUESTION

We are members of NTCA and would love some technical advice on thin panel installation.

We are supplying large-format, thin porcelain panels for an exterior façade in Oakland, Calif. It is approximately 2,500 sq. ft. at 102˝ x 47˝ x 6.5mm and we are researching installation options for the owner that do not involve the normal setting method.

It would be great to know what options there are for a “rail & clip” system versus full contact installation.

At the very least, it would be great to get some information on the guidelines and practices for installing thin panels using some sort of clip or fastening system.

ANSWER 1

Thanks for contacting us. I took a quick look at the manufacturer’s instructions. They are very typical of most gauged porcelain tile panel manufacturers. I did not see anything other than the direct bond method as an option for installation. Most distributors of thin porcelain tile have been working with installation product manufacturers and tool companies to present a system approach to installation. Some even require the use of manufacturer trained installers.

Last April there were new standards added for this product. ANSI 137.3 and ANSI 108.19.

ANSI 137.3 deal with standards for the product itself. ANSI A108.19 deals with the installation of the product.

I would encourage you to reach out to the manufacturer to see if they would recommend another fastening system. We always encourage our members to follow manufacturers’ instructions explicitly. It decreases your liability in projects.

Robb Roderick, NTCA Trainer/Presenter

ANSWER 2

Thank you for contacting our NTCA Technical Team with your question.

Robb is correct. ANSI A137.3 and ANSI A108.19 are the industry standards adopted this year for the production and installation of gauged porcelain tile and panels/slabs. These standards call for the installation of this material in a thin-bed type system with special emphasis on the installation process for floors and walls outlined in A108.19.

As Robb stated, it is important to follow the tile manufacturer’s instructions. Contact them to be sure you understand their instructions thoroughly. Deviation from installation instructions can result in lack of warranty coverage and/or acceptance of risk by the installation contractor.

The Tile Council of North America (TCNA) has the new standards available on its website for electronic download and it is taking pre-orders for a limited-edition hard copy. You can find the information to purchase an electronic version or reserve your hard copy on the TCNA website www.tcnatile.com/products-and-services/publications/218-english-publications/227-ansi-a137-3-and-a108-19.html or http://bit.ly/2i4iP4p.

Local codes will likely have specific requirements for installing tile above a certain height, especially on an exterior.  Please be certain to contact the code official responsible for the municipality this installation is located in.

Many setting material manufacturers make specialty mortars for installation of these tiles.  You will want to involve your setting material manufacturer to help you determine the best mortar for the application and ask them to work with you to write a site-specific system warranty based on their instructions and industry standards.

I am not aware of any mechanical rain-screen type fastening systems for use with gauged porcelain tile/panels; however, some tool and equipment manufacturers make a clip-type system that is used in conjunction with a thin-bed bond coat installation to provide additional mechanical attachment of large tiles in a vertical installation. One such system is manufactured by Raimondi. For more information about that system please contact Donnelly Distributing/Raimondi USA at 262-820-1212 or [email protected]

Mark Heinlein – CTI #1112, NTCA Training Director and Technical Trainer/Presenter

President’s Letter – January 2018

Respirable crystalline silica – get ready for the new OSHA regulations

I hope that you have heard this term before and have begun the process of understanding what it means and how it is affecting your business. Believe me when I say that it IS going to affect your business going forward and none of us knows exactly to what extent.

The NTCA has held seminars at Coverings, forums at TSP and published articles in TileLetter on this topic in the past year. Yet, it seems like we are just beginning to peel back the outer layers of the proverbial onion when it comes to understanding the regulation (29 CFR 1926.1153 Respirable Crystalline Silica), including “Table 1” – and what is NOT included in Table 1. Then we begin to see DOL issue “Standard Interpretations” and “Interim Enforcement Guidance” and it all gets very confusing.

From the NTCA perspective and as a business owner, I urge you to take this law very seriously. There are many reasons, but none more important than you and your employee’s safety and wellbeing. Secondly, this law is going to have a significant financial impact on your business either in compliance costs or if you ignore it, in non-compliance costs. As an employer, you should educate yourself so that you can make the appropriate business decisions for your company and make sure your bids include costs to work in compliance. If you are an employee or craft worker you should do the same so that you are aware of the risks that you are taking with you long term health. Visit this site for more information: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/topics/silica
crystalline/ or http://bit.ly/2fI23os.

On the non-compliance side, a non-serious OSHA penalty was increased in 2016 to $12,600. If that doesn’t get your attention, a repeat violation penalty could be as high as $126,000.

At this point, based on the testing that we and others have done, I believe most tile installations can be done safely and in compliance with the newly imposed regulations with proper engineered controls and tools. The one area that remains a concern is performing circular cuts larger than 4” in diameter. If you have a proven solution for this, please email me.

As if this wasn’t enough to think about and absorb, California’s law called Prop 65 – which among many other things – is going to require manufacturers and/or re-sellers to put a warning label on every box of tile and bag of mortar and grout – basically anything that contains silica. This warning label will likely be different from manufacturer to manufacturer. We will not know the full impact of this until we see what the warning labels say, but you can bet it will not make our job any easier. It is also likely that these labels will appear on all products made for our industry regardless if they are made or shipped to California simply because the chance can’t be taken that an unlabeled product shows up in California.

It’s important that you know the NTCA staff and volunteers are working hard to minimize the negative impacts of these issues on all tile contractors. I urge all to take a very proactive approach to these issues and educate yourself as quickly as possible. At the end of the day, we want tile consumption to rise across America so we must be prepared to deal appropriately with these new requirements.

Keep on tiling!

Martin Howard, NTCA President
Committee member, ANSI A108
[email protected]

Editor’s Letter – January 2018

“Whatever you do or dream you can do – begin it. Boldness has genius and power and magic in it.”  – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Happy new year, NTCA members!

I know the next year comes around like, well, clockwork, but somehow it always seems to amaze me that we are back at the start of another new year.

Of course, this is a time for resolutions that often get abandoned two weeks into the new year. But I am curious, have you ever made a business resolution that you actually kept (or a personal one, for that matter)? If so, would you be willing to share that with TileLetter readers? What was your resolution, why did you make it and how did you implement it in your business?

Here at TileLetter, we have made some resolutions for 2018 that we do plan to keep. For years TileLetter was a news magazine that brought you information about things going on in the industry as well as technical and business stories and tips to improve your business.

With today’s technology and digital news vehicles, we are changing the focus of TileLetter and how we bring you information:

  • TileLetter.com brings you daily updates on breaking news, announcements and timely information for our industry. Log in from phone, tablet or computer to see what’s new each day.
  • TileLetter Weekly and Enews & Views are short, digital newsletters that come out weekly, to alert you to significant developments and time-sensitive information in our industry.
  • TileTV is a concise video-format news magazine that’s available monthly, with convention and conference coverage, demos and the popular “Question Mark” feature in which NTCA Training Director Mark Heinlein answers your queries.
  • Of course, there are our Facebook pages – National Tile Contractors Association, NTCA Members Only and TileLetter, which also bring you timely stories and articles.
  • As for TileLetter, we are making the move to become more of a technical/educational journal. We’ll still have News and Product briefs, with a short description and links to full stories on tileletter.com. But our printed content is looking to be more of a reference document – something you can come back to again and again for help in a challenging project or for information about more efficient business operations.

We’ll also focus more keenly on our members, and their projects and showcase their work in the pages of TileLetter. So expect some changes, and let us know what you think.

One of the stories I’d like to bring your attention to in THIS issue is the Tile Geeks Project technical project. This amazing labor of love brought together a group of tile professionals who enjoy working and networking together to renovate several areas at a farm that serves the local community, especially autistic adults and children. The charge was led by NTCA member and Tile Geeks administrator Justin Kyle of Kyle’s Tile in Ocean View, Md., and 15 friends who are all part of the Tile Geeks Facebook group, supported by generous donations of setting materials by LATICRETE and tile by Crossville, in addition to tool and other sponsors.

In our Benefits Box, this month we detail the upcoming schedule for the brand new NTCA Regional Training Program, which will bring 20 local opportunities for intensive hands-on training around the country. This is a member-only training opportunity that starts in February, so try to make it when it’s scheduled near you. And Amber Fox, the NTCA Five Star Program Coordinator, will bring you periodic updates on the Five Star Program, starting this month.

We truly wish you a happy, healthy, prosperous 2018, and we pledge to do all we can to support you in that goal!

God bless,

Lesley
[email protected]

Coverings invites attendees to find new connections at 2018 edition

 

Coverings (coverings.com), the largest international tile and stone show in North America, has announced new opportunities for exhibitors and attendees to make quality connections through networking. Programs focused on network-building at the show include extended show floor hours, digitally-driven introductions facilitated via the Coverings app, and a celebration of all things tile & stone at the Coverings Celebration.

To offer attendees more time on the show floor and provide an opportunity for those wanting to stop by the show later in the work day, Coverings has announced extended hours for the opening day of the show, Tuesday, May 8. With the exhibit hall open until 6:30 p.m., this networking event – “Around the World of Tile & Stone” – will provide happy hour specials and entertainment coupled with additional time to meet fellow attendees or exhibitors and expand professional connections. Coverings exhibitors are encouraged to plan and publicize their networking activities for this event in advance by visiting Coverings.com for further information and details.

For attendees seeking new methods to discuss challenges and shared interests or to align with new potential clients for projects or business opportunities, Coverings has integrated new networking functionalities to its app. Users are encouraged to complete their attendee profiles to find connections at the show. Onsite, the Meet @ Coverings area will feature a dedicated open meeting space with tables and chairs, creating an environment dedicated to fostering relationships and cultivating a connected industry.

“We are incredibly committed to offering all attendees and exhibitors endless ways to forge deeper connections in the tile and stone industry,” said Jennifer Hoff, president of Taffy Events, the management company for Coverings. “We are constantly looking for ways to enhance the Coverings experience, and we are pleased to provide new networking opportunities and new ways to explore all the show has to offer.”

All attendees are also invited to attend the Coverings Celebration for an evening of festivities and dancing with fellow members of the industry on the last evening of the show, Thursday, May 10. Hosted at the College Football Hall of Fame, this social event delivers networking in a celebratory setting. Tickets to attend must be purchased at the time of registration for the show or online by Friday, May 4.

# # #

Coverings Social Media

Facebook: facebook.com/CoveringsShow

Twitter: @Coverings, #Coverings2018

Pinterest: pinterest.com/Coverings

Instagram: instagram.com/CoveringsShow

YouTube: youtube.com/TheCoveringsShow

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/groups?mostPopular=&gid=1693367

Google +: google.com/+Coverings
Blog: coverings.com/blog 

About Coverings

Coverings is the largest and most important ceramic tile and natural stone trade fair and expo in the United States. It features exhibitors from more than 40 countries and is the stage for introducing some of the most innovative tile and stone products in the world.

 

The exposition serves as a valuable resource for continuing education for all segments of the industry, with more than 75 informative, accredited seminars and live demonstration sessions throughout the show, all free of charge. Coverings attracts thousands of distributors, retailers, fabricators, contractors, specifiers, architectural and design professionals, builders and real estate developers, as well as journalists and bloggers who cover this vital and dynamic industry.

 

Sponsors of the show are The Ceramic Tile Distributor Association (CTDA), Tile of Spain/Spanish Ceramic Tile Manufacturer’s Association  (ASCER), Ceramics of Italy/Confindustria Ceramica, National Tile Contractors Association (NTCA) and the Tile Council of North America (TCNA). The show is managed by Taffy Event Strategies, LLC.

 

Coverings 2018 takes place May 8-11 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA. For more information, visit coverings.com or contact Taffy Events, Coverings Show Management, 703-539-5504.

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