NTCA issues position statement in reference to method EJ 171

One of the most consistent installation replacement or repair claims made in the tile industry centers around problems associated with the lack of accounting for movement of a building and how it affects the tile assembly.  The National Tile Contractors Association felt the issue is so signifiant to tile contractors that it issued a position statement that will be published in its 2017 edition of the NTCA Reference Manual.  At the heart of the concern is who bears the responsibility for designing, specifying or locating movement joints in a tile installation.  It points out that special attention to method EJ 171, located in the Tile Council of North America Handbook for the Installation of Ceramic and Stone tile, should be considered.
The position statement will be made available to all NTCA contractor members to include in documentation and correspondence.  Its intent is to point out that it is beyond the scope and ability of a tile contractor to properly design and specify movement accommodation, for either commercial or residential tile construction projects.

Lack of Movement Joints in a tile assembly can lead to installation failure

Tile Contractors and their installers should be aware of EJ 171 and its requirements, and should use the position statement to request in writing where the movement joints should be located.  They should use this method to point out to the building owner or design professional that the tile industry recommends that movement joints be installed every 20 to 25 feet in each direction in interior applications,and every 8 to 12 feet in each direction on exterior projects.  If interior jobs are exposed to direct sunlight or moisture, it should be treated as an exterior project and have movement joints located every 8 to 12 feet in each direction.

The NTCA recommends that the tile contractor take the responsibility to point out the requirements of EJ 171 before they begin the tile work and to not take on unnecessary liability by proceeding with work until movement accommodation is addressed.

To order your copy of the NTCA Reference Manual, go to www.tile-assn.com and visit the NTCA store.

New Slip Resisting Tile from Metropolitan Ceramics

With the addition of XA Abrasive to their QUARRYBASICS® product line, Metropolitan Ceramics® introduces the next evolution of slip resisting tile. XA Abrasive combines two grip enhancing additives in one tile for decades of slip resisting performance.

During manufacturing, in the raw material blending stage, a metallic additive is incorporated into the mix of natural clays and shales that go into making XA Abrasive. After extrusion, silicon carbide is added to the surface of each XA tile.

This one-of-a-kind combination of a silicon carbide embedded surface and a metallic additive through the body of the tile work together to combat the effects of spills, moisture, extreme temperatures, and heavy traffic.

Like Metropolitan Ceramics other unglazed quarry products, XA Abrasive is low absorption, less than 3% and qualifies as vitreous. And at ½” thick, XA Abrasive is extremely durable and ready for the most demanding environments.

Use XA Abrasive anywhere spills/moisture and heavy traffic combine to create slip fall concerns. Commercial kitchens and food prep areas are two prime examples of spaces that would benefit from using XA Abrasive.

There are four color options available with XA Abrasive, 31XA Mayflower Red, 57XA Puritan Gray, 15XA Buckskin, and 18XA Chestnut Brown. The product line is available in 6” x 6”, 8” x 8”, and 4” x 8” sizes.

For more information about XA Abrasive or any of their other fine products, you can call Metropolitan Ceramics customer service at 1-800–325-3945. You can also visit the Metropolitan Ceramics website – www.metroceramics.com.