Bostik Inc. – February 2017 Feature

To many, Snowbird, Utah is known as a multi-facility resort community. 150 years ago, it was known for its adjacent silver mines, but the shining draw today is top-shelf winter powder skiing and snowboarding.

One major magnet, The Cliff Lodge and Spa, not only enjoys an outstanding Snowbird location near loads of Utah’s finest ski resorts, golf clubs, and other attractions, it also boasts some of the most unique and progressive architectural and design treatments one could imagine. Featuring wall-to-wall windows with awe-inspiring mountain or canyon views, Cliff Lodge vistas are modern, spacious, and sumptuously well equipped. Cliff Lodge owners wanted some new indoor visuals, which resulted in two very large mosaic murals installed, designed by Edge ID.

Kari Bennett is principal/interior designer at Edge ID, a full-service hospitality design company, located in Salt Lake City. Bennett prides her firm on “researching, planning, designing, involving and orchestrating all projects to the last detail.” Such was the case for this highly innovative mosaic mural installation at The Cliff Lodge and Spa.

Close up of the individual vitreous glass mosaics used to create the aspen tree mural, incorporating Bostik’s Dimension® RapidCure™ Glass-Filled, Pre-Mixed, Urethane Grout. The custom mosaic was designed by Artaic Innovative Mosaic.

Creating an aspen tree “wow factor” for the interior

“We wanted in some way to bring the outdoors indoors,” declared Bennett. “There are so many beautiful vistas surrounding The Cliff Lodge. In particular, there are exquisite aspen trees indigenous to this part of the country, which look good year-round. So we made the collective decision to create an amazing aspen tree ‘wow factor’ motif on two large walls, one being in the ballroom lobby, and the other in the ballroom mezzanine. These were to be very large murals, each thirty feet wide by four feet high… 120 sq. ft.… each consisting of over 166,000 individual vitreous glass mosaic pieces.

“We knew a bit about Artaic, and how the firm offered a unique, space-age service of creating mosaic murals using computer-driven robots,” she added. “Artaic provided us with its mosaic depiction of an aspen tree motif. We immediately liked it, but wanted to change the color of the trees from black-grey to more of a sepia tone, which was more relevant to the Snowbird landscape’s colors. Artaic had no trouble whatsoever accommodating our request. The people there were without question, very professional and a joy to work with.”

The Cliff Lodge and Spa, Snowbird, Utah, 30’ x 4’ mosaic utilizing 166,000 individual vitreous glass mosaic pieces creates an aspen tree motif in colors that more perfectly fit the sepia-toned interior design scheme.

Inventor and scientist, Artaic’s Dr. Ted Acworth, added, “When Artaic was asked to design a beautiful custom mosaic for the Cliff Lodge renovation, we learned the designer was looking for a custom mosaic that really reflected the beautiful natural environment of the Utah landscape. We were provided with a photograph of a stand of aspen trees… loaded that image into our proprietary design software, and subsequently designed a beautiful custom mural out of glass tile from that image. This was not hard to do, especially when working with clients who knew what they wanted and understood our process.”

NTCA member Katwyk Tile handles the installation

Bennett went on to say that the tile installation contractor, NTCA member Rod Katwyk, owner of Katwyk Tile, was quite stoked about using Bostik materials for this massive mural project. “We believe we were hired because of the ‘touch and finesse’ we offer,” he said. “The people at Artaic highly recommended, Bostik’s Dimension® RapidCure™ Grout, which we had used previously and were confident would be ideal for this project. To begin with, we used exterior grade plywood, perfectly fitting it on the walls. Once it was glued and screwed in, we used Bostik’s GoldPlus™ crack isolation product, (ready-to-use, roller-applied latex waterproofing and anti-fracture membrane for use beneath thinset ceramic tile installations) which also served as a good primer and bonding agent to the plywood. After applying two coats, we started installing the Artaic mosaic sheets from the center of each mural. To do so, the thinset we chose was Bostik’s Glass-Mate™, using it one bag at a time. We were very happy how the material ‘stayed active’ in the bucket, which gave us time to adjust each sheet if need be. By far, this is my favorite glass tile thinset!”

The installation crew from Katwyk Tile use Bostik’s Dimension® RapidCure™ Glass-Filled, Pre-Mixed, Urethane Grout to grout the glass mosaic mural.

Bostik Glass-Mate is a premium, polymer-modified, thin-set mortar that exhibits superior bond strength, durability, non-sag properties and workability. Its bright white color and high polymer content make it ideal for installations such as that at The Cliff Lodge and Spa.

Katwyk added that grouting was accomplished with Bostik’s Dimension RapidCure Grout, which his company knew well. “We reached out to Bostik for advice, and Bostik came through,” he said. “All their products are easy to use, their customer service is great!”

Bostik grout offers “another light source” to the project

Acworth added, “Our relationship with Bostik began when we started using Dimension RapidCure Grout – their unique formulation that contains 60% recycled glass content – in our productions. The product is easy to apply, highly durable and most of all, actually adds more luminosity to mosaic productions. For example, if a project contains glass mosaics, imagine another light source being incorporated: that’s what Dimension RapidCure offers.”

Designer Bennett remarked, “We believe great design should be simple, so our process is one of honesty and communication throughout. Not only do we think it’s the right way to do business, but it does wonders for keeping efficiency up and costs down. Working with great suppliers such as Bostik, Artaic and Katwyk Tile, we were able to once again implement our philosophy for the mosaic murals at The Cliff Lodge.”

Scott Banda, Bostik’s director of Marketing and Business Development, summed it all up. “Along with our strategic partner, Artaic, Bostik is on a mission to resurrect the ancient art of mosaic design,” he said. “We’re bringing it back worldwide. The two murals at The Cliff Lodge and Spa are perfect examples of how mosaic masterpieces can once again be specified by the architectural and design community. We are proud and pleased to be an active participant in this ongoing, successful global quest.”

A video has been produced of this world-class project by Bostik. You may view it by clicking on
bit.ly/SnowbirdVideo.

Kari Bennett, principal/interior designer at Edge ID, a full-service Salt Lake City hospitality design firm wanted to bring the outdoors indoors, drawing on the beauty of the stunning vistas surrounding the lodge. The indigenous aspen trees in the area inspired the “wow factor” mosaic.

Business Tip – February 2017

Top 5 tips to avoid ambiguity in construction contracts

By Yasir Billoo, partner at International Law Partners

Avoiding ambiguity should be a primary goal when drafting and negotiating construction contracts. This helps ensure that you get what you want, including the bargained-for benefits of the contract, smooth contract administration and fulfillment, and avoidance of lengthy and expensive legal disputes. Follow these five tips to minimize ambiguities:

1. Keep it simple.

Keep your writing simple, clear and concise. Construction contracts are read and interpreted by a wide variety of people, including judges with no knowledge of the construction industry. Using plain English and shorter sentences while avoiding legalese and redundancy will make your contracts easier to read and understand.

2. If it’s part of the agreement, include it in the contract.

If a contract appears complete and comprehensive on its face, courts will prohibit the use of other documents to give meaning to the parties’ intentions. Statements made during pre-bid meetings or negotiations will not be effective in contradicting express terms in the contract. Include all terms of the deal in the contract, or incorporate key documents by reference.

3. Define key terms.

Courts give ordinary terms their ordinary meanings and technical terms their technical meanings. But the meanings of words cannot be divorced from the context in which they are interpreted, and parties often disagree on what terms mean in certain contexts. To avoid disputes, capitalize and define terms to attribute specific meaning. Then use the capitalized term as needed throughout the contract.

4. Include an order-of-precedence clause.

Because numerous documents make up construction contracts, conflicts may arise between requirements contained within the documents, such as the drawings and specifications. One way to address these conflicts is to include a clause providing that in the event of a conflict, the specifications take precedence over the drawings, or that contract documents take precedence according to a prescribed order of hierarchy. You may also wish to include a provision stating that what is required of any contract document shall be binding as if required by all.

5. Make proper use of standard forms.

Standard-form agreements such as AIA and ConsensusDocs are commonly used throughout the construction industry. However…there are risks with using such forms because they are written broadly, they may contain terms that are inapplicable to the transaction at issue, and parties often use such forms without fully reviewing them. Even if both parties orally agree to terms that differ from what is written, oral understandings will yield to written agreements, so it is important to read all the terms before using standard-form agreements. Add terms you think should be included in the contract and delete terms that are inapplicable.

Yasir Billoo is an experienced attorney in the areas of business/commercial contracts and litigation, real estate transactions (and title services) and litigation, intellectual property litigation, employment and labor, and civil appeals. Yasir’s experience ranges from representing large Fortune 500 companies in complex litigation and appeals in state and federal court, to helping small business owners with simple agreements and legal consulting.

Yasir earned his law degree from Nova Southeastern University in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and was admitted to both the Florida Bar and the California Bar in 2004. He is admitted to practice in all courts in each of these states.

Yasir earned dual Bachelors Degrees in International Relations and Communications from Florida International University. While earning his Juris Doctor, he was a member of the Jessup International Law Moot Court team and on the Board of the Journal of International and Comparative Law. A native of Karachi, Pakistan, Yasir, speaks English, Spanish, Urdu, Hindi and Memoni.

Prior to practicing law, Yasir managed the finances of a group of Central American companies, handling complex international financial transactions.

Yasir currently serves as a Hearing Officer for Miami-Dade County’s Commission on Human Rights, where he presides over appeals of initial determinations in cases where discrimination is alleged.

Yasir is a member of the prestigious invitation-only International Association of Defense Counsel (IADC). IADC has been serving a distinguished membership of corporate and insurance defense attorneys and insurance executives since 1920. The IADC membership is comprised of the world’s leading corporate and insurance lawyers and insurance executives. They are partners in large and small law firms, senior counsel in corporate law departments, and corporate and insurance executives. Members represent the largest corporations around the world, including the majority of companies listed in the FORTUNE 500. Reach him at intlawpartners.com

Ask the Experts – February 2017

QUESTION

I’m a homeowner in Berkeley, Calif. On my recently completed bath renovation, we’ve found that the shower curb collects water and it takes a long time to dry even with ventilation. I’m trying to determine if this condition meets industry standards or if it would legitimately be considered a defect. Someone online recommended NTCA may be able to provide help.

ANSWER

Thank you for contacting The National Tile Contractors Association. The TCNA Handbook’s wet area guidelines state that horizontal surfaces must be sloped to direct water to the drain. The slope recommended is no less than 1/4” per foot.

I couldn’t tell a whole lot from the picture you sent, but it appears there is metal endstop trimming out your curb. If that endstop edge is above the edge of the tile, it can sometimes act as a dam on curbs that are sloped. Many shower systems incorporate surface waterproofing that lays right under the tile and can be easily damaged by removing tile. I would suggest tiling over the existing curb tile using a chair rail or some type of specialty trim to maintain the integrity of the waterproofing below the surface. Guidelines for tiling over the existing tile are found in the renovation section of the TCNA Handbook in section TR711. Scarification or primers are sometimes needed. And always make sure to use the correct adhesive for tiling over tile in a wet area.

– Robb Roderick, NTCA trainer/presenter

QUESTION, part 2

Thank you very much for the prompt and helpful response! Much appreciate the advice to tile over rather than break tile and risk waterproofing damage.

You are right – there is a stainless steel edge on the curb; it seems to be proud and acting as a dam.

Regarding the tile-over repair – a question. The manufacturer says the 24” x 24” tile we are using is slightly bowed for water runoff. I suspect the current ponding is related to this. Can this type of tile be cut for successful use on a curb like this, and if so are there standards for how to do this correctly so the repair is successful?

ANSWER, part 2

The tile you have selected appears to be pretty typical as far as inherent warpage. A byproduct of the firing process in tile manufacturing is that tiles become bowed or warped. This normally manifests itself with the center of tile being the high point and the edges being the low points. There are ANSI standards for what is and is not allowable for warpage. Considering you purchased the material from a reputable manufacturer, I’m sure it would follow in the acceptable guidelines for warpage, since this company has a great track record of offering quality tile.

As far as doing the repair within standards, the requirements are for the existing installation to be sound, well bonded, and without cracks. All soap scum, wax, or coatings must be removed from the surface prior to installation. You may want to scarify or prime the surface of the tile prior to the installation to increase bond strength. Always select a mortar that is approved for tile-over-tile installations. Incorporate your 1/4” per foot minimum slope in the new assembly. Most curbs are 6” so this would equate to a minimum of 1/8” drop.

– Robb Roderick, NTCA trainer/presenter

President’s Letter – February 2017

The NTCA logo: the mark of excellence for Best in Class tile professionals

According to several industry sources, the more than 1,300 members of NTCA account for only a fraction of companies working as tile and stone installers in the U.S. market. My sincere hope is that all 1,300+ members of the NTCA have joined because they are committed to being a best-in-class tile and stone professional. There are many benefits of membership, including a free annual copy of the NTCA Reference Manual, free technical advice, discount programs for shipping, insurance, vehicle purchases, safety programs, marketing templates and many more. The Partnering for Success voucher program allows each member to individually choose vouchers for free or discounted products with a total annual value of $2,000, far exceeding the cost of membership.

Collectively, these programs are more than enough reason to join the NTCA, but for me personally, the most important benefit of being an NTCA member is the right to use the nationally recognized logo on all my business communications.

One of my goals as your president over the next two years is to ensure that every member has the opportunity to increase his or her skill as a professional installer – and also grow as a professional business owner. I want the NTCA logo to be recognized by architects, designers, building owners and the public as the mark of excellence in the tile and stone industry. They should have confidence that when selecting and hiring a contractor member of NTCA, they are getting a “Best in Class” professional. Obviously, the NTCA is limited in its ability to ensure that all members are committed to this goal. However, we can make sure that we provide all the tools necessary to assist all members as they endeavor to grow their skills and business acumen. If this craft is providing the opportunity for us to succeed, we should be motivated to invest in expanding our capabilities and skills.

This comprehensive goal will take time, but I’m proud to share with you that due to the vision and dedication of the NTCA staff and volunteers, many of these tools exist today and are at your disposal. I encourage every member to invest in NTCA University, which allows every employee to have personalized access to a wide variety of educational opportunities. Access includes the new and developing Apprenticeship course, and the entire Business Plan section with over 50 classes that include  accounting, marketing, interviewing and hiring, business ethics, negotiating contracts,business continuation planning strategies and more. Over 30 live webcast seminars with the accompanying PowerPoint presentations are also included.

By definition, “professional” means that we are never finished learning, growing and improving our ability to be the best. I challenge every NTCA member to think about 2017 and what you are doing to continually educate and train yourself and your team. Spend some time looking at what is offered; tell us what we are missing and how we can partner with you to become a Best in Class tile and stone contractor that proudly displays the NTCA logo.

Sincerely,

Martin Howard, President NTCA

Committee Member, ANSI A108

[email protected]

BUSINESS TIP – JANUARY 2017

IRS continues to enforce “reasonable” sharehold-employee salaries

 

 

In the ceramic tile industry there are many small businesses which may be Subchapter S Corporations, since there are many appealing tax benefits while still providing liability protection to the shareholders. If you’re a shareholder-employee of an S Corporation, you more than likely considered the tax advantages of this entity choice. But those very same tax advantages also tend to draw IRS scrutiny. And the agency has made clear that its interest in S Corporations – including possible audits – will continue. The IRS focuses on determining whether the salary of the shareholders is unreasonably low. The tactics listed below will help protect your company from this IRS examination.

 

 
What’s the problem?
The IRS pays particular attention to S Corporations because, as you well know, shareholder-employees of these organizations aren’t subject to self-employment taxes on their respective shares of the company’s income. This differs from, say, general partners in a partnership.

 
To better manage payroll taxes, many S Corporations minimize shareholder-employee salaries (which are subject to payroll taxes) and compensate them mostly via “dividend” distributions. If this holds true for you, the IRS may take a close look at your salary to determine whether it’s “unreasonably” low. The agency views overly-minimized salaries as an improper means of avoiding payroll taxes.
If its case is strong enough, the IRS could recharacterize a portion of distributions paid to you and other shareholder-employees as wages and bill the employer and/or employee for unpaid taxes, interest and possibly even penalties.

How do you define it?
By following certain guidelines, your business can ensure salaries paid to you and other shareholder-employees have a higher likelihood of meeting the agency’s typical standards of reasonableness.
For starters, do some benchmarking to learn how S Corporations of similar size (as indicated by capital value, net income or sales) in your industry and geographic region are paying their shareholder-employees. In addition, pay close attention to certain traits held by your shareholder-employees. These include:
Background and experience
Specific responsibilities
Work hours
Professional reputation
Customer relationships

 

The stronger these traits are, the higher the salary should be in the eyes of the IRS. Shareholder-employee salaries should be fairly consistent from year to year, too, without dramatic raises or cuts.
For more in-depth information about the particulars of S Corporations, visit https://www.thebalance.com/the-s-corporation-your-questions-answered-397844 or http://tinyurl.com/hp2qwna.

 
CTDA helps you succeed in your business through a variety of programs and services that include educational opportunities, webinars, and discounts on shipping, client collection services, telephone charges, auto rentals, and more. CTDA offers networking and relationship-building opportunities through participation in Total Solutions Plus all-industry conference and Coverings annual trade show. Membership in CTDA also increases your national exposure and gives you access to the annual membership survey, a valuable resource to evaluate your company in terms of profit improvement, employee compensation, distribution and company performance. The CTDA website, CTDA Educational Opportunities, Weekly Newsletters and TileDealer Blog are all free resources that will “keep you in the loop” as well. CTDA is always looking for ways to improve the benefits of membership. To learn more about membership, please contact [email protected] or 630-545-9415 visit the website at www.ctdahome.org. Like CTDA on Facebook and Twitter @Ceramic Tile Distributors Association (CTDA).

BY THE BOOK – JANUARY 2017

ANSI Standards:
a tile installer’s best friend!

 

By Scott Carothers,
CTEF director of Certification and Training

How familiar are you with the ANSI American National Standards Specifications for the Installation of Ceramic Tile? (ANSI stands for the American National Standards Institute.) If you aren’t, and you’re in the tile installation business, it’s time you pay attention. ANSI Standards are a tile installer’s best friend!

Why tile installers should study the TCNA Handbook and ANSI Specifications
For continued success, tile installers should study the TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass and Stone Tile Installation and ANSI Specifications, retaining as much as possible, or at least knowing where to find the answers. These books can be your best friend as this article – based on a true story – explains.
Here’s how the story goes.

 


After successfully completing the Large Format Tile and Substrate Prep test – one of the  ained in the Advanced Certifications for Tile Installers (ACT) program – an installer returned to work installing tile while also being the jobsite superintendent.
On this particular day, the superintendent was representing his company at a pre-job conference with the architect since the business owner was not available.
The architect reviewed the scope of the job involving the tile installation and said that the job included a 12” x 24” non-rectified porcelain tile which was specified to be installed in a running bond (brick pattern), at a fifty percent offset and a 1/32” grout joint.

When current ANSI Specifications call for a different application
The now ACT-certified installer politely informed the architect that the current ANSI Specification, A108.02 under section 4.3.8, calls for a much different application.
Here follow the criteria excerpted from ANSI A108.02 Section 4.3.8 regarding grout joint size, particularly in relation to the tile size, dimensional precision, and offset pattern:

4.3.8 Grout Joint Size:
To accommodate the range in facial dimensions of the tile supplied for a specific project, the actual grout joint size may, of necessity, vary from the grout joint size specified. The actual grout joint size shall be at least three times the actual variation of facial dimensions of the tile supplied. Example: for tile having a total variation of 1/16” in facial dimensions, a minimum of 3/16” grout joint shall be used. Nominal centerline of all joints shall be straight with due allowances for hand-molded or rustic tiles. In no circumstance shall the grout joint be less than 1/16”.

4.3.8.1 Running Bond/Brick Joint Patterns:
For running bond/brick joint patterns utilizing tiles (square or rectangular) with any side greater than 15”, the grout joint shall be, on average, a minimum of 1/8” wide for rectified tiles and, on average, a minimum of 3/16” wide for calibrated (non-rectified) tiles. The grout joint width shall be increased over the minimum requirement by the amount of edge warpage on the longest edge of the actual tiles being installed. For example, for a rectified tile exhibiting 1/32” edge warpage on the longest edge, the minimum grout joint for a running bond/brick joint pattern will be 1/8” + 1/32” or 5/32”, on average. Of necessity, in any installation, some grout joints will be less and some more than the average minimum dimension to accommodate the specific tiles being installed.

4.3.8.2 Running Bond/Brick Joint Offset:
For running bond/brick joint patterns utilizing tiles (square or rectangular) where the side being offset is greater than 18” (nominal dimension), the running bond offset will be a maximum of 33% unless otherwise specified by the tile manufacturer. If an offset greater than 33% is specified, specifier and owner must approve mock-up and lippage.

The ANSI Standard-based solution
The installer paraphrased the ANSI specification saying, “The tile is to be installed in a running bond offset at a maximum of 33% with a 3/16” grout joint.”
The architect asked the installer where he found this information and how he knew it so well. The installer showed the architect the portion of the ANSI book containing that standard, and told him that he became aware of this and many other aspects of the industry standards through his studies in preparation for the ACT certification tests. The architect reviewed the ANSI listing and agreed that the specifications would be modified to follow the standard that the installer had described. The tile was installed successfully and everyone involved was satisfied with the end result.
The owner of the tile company, who was absent through this process, is convinced that had they installed the tile as originally specified, the job would have been rejected due to edge lippage, requiring it to be removed and replaced.

Get to know the tile installer’s best friend!
The ANSI Standards-based knowledge saved this contractor a significant amount of time and potential expense. Using knowledge wisely can reap large benefits. Wouldn’t you agree?
Have you encountered tile installation situations where the ANSI Standards were truly your best friend? Please share your experiences with us at [email protected]

The Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) is an educational institution that offers local, regional, and national training programs for consumers, installers, construction professionals, architects, designers, building inspectors and sales associates interested in the sale and installation of ceramic tile. Find out more at ceramictilefoundation.org.

 

QUALIFIED LABOR – JANUARY 2017

CTEF, NTCA develop Regional Evaluator program to facilitate CTI testing

By Kevin Insalato,
Regional Evaluator Coordinator

The CTEF and the NTCA are listening. The demand for qualified labor is RED HOT. If you are a talented and quality-oriented tile installer, you are in demand. The best way to prove to a dealer, tile contractor or consumer that you are a qualified installer is to pass the Certified Tile Installer (CTI) test.
In the past, the demand for CTI testing outpaced the supply. But NTCA’s Bart Bettiga and Jim Olson and CTEF’s Scott Carothers heard the screams to be tested and took action. The NTCA has tasked me to develop a plan to meet the demand for testing installers across the United States.

Invested in training
My name is Kevin Insalato, Region 5 Director and Board Member for the NTCA. I am the owner of California Flooring, which installs all types of flooring and performs full-bathroom remodeling. Our employees believe in training. Five are CTIs, one installer just took the CTI test, and our newest employee is taking the online Apprenticeship Program at the NTCA University (http://www.tile-assn.com/?page=NTCAU). Two of our CTIs are also ACT-Certified in Large Format Tile. California Flooring is a small residential business.

The CTI Evaluator program expands
Originally, the CTEF had one evaluator, but the demand for additional testing grew that number to four evaluators testing new candidates. We started a Regional Evaluator (RE) program to add and localize our REs. The training for this new group of REs began in November 2016. We held a three-day session for eight new evaluators in Chicago. All 12 Regional Evaluators worked together to revamp the original evaluation program and streamline the testing. Our intention is to provide a grading system that is transparent, fair and maintains the integrity of the CTI test.
The future of CTI testing will continue to pair candidates and distributor / manufacturer host sites. The mobility and regional advantages of our new REs will benefit NTCA members and non-members alike. The honor of hosting a CTI test is now available to those dealers and contractors willing to share their facilities. Contact me at [email protected] and we will get you on the list to be tested.

New program details:
Discounts and coupons
The amazing news about the test is the cost is only $495. This covers both the cost of your written test and hands-on skills test. All the materials you will need to prepare for this test are included. There are also videos available that will assist you to prepare for the hands-on test section.
The manufacturers recognize the importance of this test and support it strongly. You will receive $1,200 in manufacturers’ coupons after successfully passing your test.
Great news for dealers or contractors planning to test three or more employees at one time – we have a discount for you. The test price is lowered to $395 and you still receive $950 in coupons for each candidate that passes the CTI test. If you are a large dealer or contractor and we test 10 or more of your employees at one time, your test price is only $295 each, with coupons worth $ 700 for every candidate that passes the CTI tests.
The CTEF wants to continue to thank past supporters of the CTI program. For this reason, after you pay for 10 candidates to take the CTI test, every additional candidate will qualify for the top discount price of $295 with a return of $700 in coupons for every successful test candidate. We will meet your demands and get you tested. The tile industry wants you to become a Certified Tile Installer and they are willing to prove it!

EDITOR’S LETTER – JANUARY 2017

“Our business in life is not to get ahead of others, but to get ahead of ourselves – to break our own records, to outstrip our yesterday by our today.”
– Steward B. Johnson

1947. Do you remember what you were doing then? Maybe you were graduating from high school or starting a business, or maybe you weren’t even a twinkle in your mom’s and dad’s eyes yet.
1947 is a popular date here in New Mexico, where I have my home office, since that was the year of the “Roswell UFO Incident,” which purports that an unidentified flying object crashed near Roswell.

It was an important year for India and Pakistan, since both countries gained independence from Great Britain.

 
Harry Truman was the U.S. president, and signed The National Security Act of 1947 into law; the Cold war began; The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank was in the bookstores; The United Nations voted to create an independent Jewish State of Israel; the film “Miracle on 34th Street” premiered in the U.S.; The first of the Dead Sea Scrolls was discovered in Qumran; Princess Elizabeth married the Duke of Edinburgh; Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers; and “I’ve Got a Crush on You,” and “Always” sung by Frank Sinatra were on the top song charts.

 
1947 was important for another reason too – that’s the year that NTCA began as the Southern Tile Contractors Association (STCA) in Birmingham, Ala., under the direction of executive director Jim Trimm. STCA catered to tile contractors in 13 southern states, promoting ceramic tile and quality installation. From humble beginnings (and several name changes), it has evolved into the largest tile contractor association in the world. Joe Tarver took over the leadership of the association in 1972 when it was known as the Southern Tile Terrazzo Marble Contractors Association, and with other dedicated industry members, spearheaded the NTCA Workshop Program which took education on the road around the country; and then in 2002 Bart Bettiga took the reins to develop it to where it is today – expanding the nonprofit association’s charter of education, training, networking.
You’ll undoubtedly be hearing a lot about NTCA history over these next 12 months as we celebrate our 70th Anniversary – from the evolution of the industry convention into Coverings and then spinning off a little management and leadership conference we now know as Total Solutions Plus; the development of the Technical Committee and those first NTCA Reference Manuals and of course TileLetter, which was produced tirelessly by Myra Caldwell, who passed away last year.

 
As we skip down memory lane, I invite you to share with me your favorite memories of NTCA over the years. Maybe you were part of those early “road shows,” committees or conferences; maybe you have a unique perspective of how the industry and association has evolved over the years. Please share at [email protected], and let’s skip down memory lane and celebrate our association’s accomplishments together!

God bless,

Lesley
[email protected]

 

Ask the Experts – January 2017

QUESTION

Attached are pictures of an exterior grout leaching problem we are having on concrete, waterproofed with a membrane with a latex-modified thinset mortar and sanded grout with additive. Latex leaching (or efflorescence?) came through the grout not long after installation.
We removed all the grout three weeks ago and covered with plastic as you can see. It never got wet for those three weeks and we had fans on the tile. Yet when a penknife was pulled through the joints, the material was still a little damp and the latex is still coming through.
We feel it is in the mortar we used. A manufacturer rep is supposed to look at it. The manufacturer said for us to use unsanded grout with an additive. I do not feel like that will work at all – the latex is leaching through, even with no grout in the joints.
We felt like an epoxy grout would be the answer to fix this. What is your professional opinion on this?

ANSWER

My suspicion is that this is latex migration coming from the mortar.
This does not necessarily mean it is a problem with the mortar itself. I suspect the latex in the mortar may not have been allowed to fully coalesce and may continue to be an issue. Have you lifted a tile to examine the coverage and condition of the bond coat?
It is good that you have asked the manufacturer for a review. They will be able to assist you in determining whether this is efflorescence or latex migration, and its source. If the residue is powdery and salty it is efflorescence. If it is hard and more difficult to remove it is likely latex migration.
It is important to solve the problem then select the grout. Trying to lock in the migration with epoxy grout is not necessarily a cure for the issue. The source of the efflorescence or latex migration must be determined then remedied to ensure a long term successful solution.
If epoxy is eventually selected as a grout, ensure it is rated for UV exposure on an exterior installation.
– Mark Heinlein
CTI #1112,
NTCA Technical Trainer/Presenter

NTCA Benefits Box – January 2017

benefitsboxNTCA offers two “partner” programs in its package for members: PartnerShip® and Partnering for Success

PartnerShip

partnershipPartnerShip, the endorsed shipping management provider of NTCA, offers shipping discounts to all NTCA members on select FedEx® services, as well as savings on less-than-truckload (LTL) freight shipments arranged through PartnerShip. This program is FREE to all NTCA members, with no minimums required.

Members can request a no-obligation free quote for standard or guaranteed LTL (less-than-truckload) services from PartnerShip freight broker. The service works with the reputable LTL carriers, including: AAA Cooper, Estes Express, FedEx Freight, Dayton Freight, Old Dominion, New Penn, Pitt Ohio, R+L Carriers, Reddaway, Southeastern, UPS Freight, YRC Freight and many more!

Services also include full or partial truckload (dry van, flat bed, step deck, refrigerated, etc.). PartnerShip employs a stringent carrier review process and has access to thousands of the top truckload freight carriers across North America.

If you need to ship to a trade show, PartnerShip can help with this as well, as it can arrange great shipping rates with leading exhibit freight carriers. The company has a relationship with UPS Freight and YRC Freight and, if needed, can secure other carrier options as well.

Interested in learning more about PartnerShip or becoming a NTCA member? Contact assistant executive director Jim Olson at 612-788-4726 or email [email protected]

Partnering for Success

NTCA’s Partnering for Success benefit virtually pays you to be a member! Leading installation material manufacturers have invested in NTCA members by offering same-as-cash vouchers for valuable products you use every day – $1,800 worth of vouchers to be exact. This enables contractor members to experience all NTCA has to offer and actually MAKE money as an NTCA member when using Partnering for Success vouchers.

Participating manufacturers authorize NTCA to provide vouchers for their products that can be redeemed by NTCA contractor members, directly from the manufacturer or through any participating distributors. A total of $1,800 in vouchers is provided in contractor membership packets in these product categories: backer board, setting and grouting materials, membranes, cleaning and sealing materials, tools, floor heating systems, and ceramic tile.

In 2017, Home Depot will accept vouchers from QEP, Custom, and James Hardie.

Participating manufacturers for 2017 include: Alpha Professional Tools, American Olean, Aqua Mix, ARDEX, ATR Leveling, Bellota, Blanke, Ceramic Tool, Composeal, Contractors Direct, Custom Building Products, Daltile, Dependable Bagging, Emser, Flextherm, Florida Tile, LATICRETE, MAPEI, MAPEI Ultracare, Marazzi Tile, Mark E. Industries, Metropolitan Ceramics, MLT, NAC Products, National Gypsum/Permabase, Noble Company, NTCA Store, NTCA University, Nuheat, Oceancare, Porcelain Plus Speed Bit, Proflex, QEP, Rubi Tools, Schluter, Sun Touch, TEC Specialty, Texrite, The Home Depot, Trending Accessiblity, Trimaco, USG, VanHearron, Warmly Yours and wedi. Select the vouchers you want for the products you use or have been meaning to try. Vouchers are either used as cash, good for discounts or provide rebates on purchased products, depending on the manufacturer. For information, contact Jim Olson, NTCA assistant executive director, at 612-788-4726 or [email protected]

1 2 3 16