Tech Tip Tuesday: Q & A With NTCA Training Director Mark Heinlein – 10/24/2017

Member Question:

We are encountering issues with a wall tile installation. I am trying to find out what the wall assembly should consist of in regards to metal studs, horizontal reinforcement, etc.   Your response would be greatly appreciated.

Mark’s Response:

Thank you for contacting the National Tile Contractors Association.

Please refer to the Tile Council of North America (TCNA) Handbook Method W243-17 for the details and best practices for the wall installation you are dealing with.  This method requires metal studs to be well braced; 20 gauge (0.033”) or heavier; minimum depth 3-5/8” for commercial applications.  The gypsum board must meet ASTM C1396/C1396M with a minimum of 1/2” thickness for single layer applications and must be installed per GA-216.  Maximum allowable variation of the substrate (for the installation of 12”x12” tile) is to not exceed 1/4” in 10’ (feet) from the required plane with no more than 1/16” variation in 12” when measured from the high points in the surface.  Additionally, details for movement and expansion must be met as required by TCNA Handbook method EJ-171.

I have attached a photo of the section of the 2017 TCNA Handbook that discusses “Equivalent Gauge” Steel Framing in case that material has been used on this project.

In addition, the NTCA Reference Manual includes an excellent discussion of EQ Gauge steel framing.  It states, in part, that the wall framing should meet a deflection limit of L/360 for the rated load based on the properties of the stud alone.  It further states that it is the responsibility of the design professional and framing contractor to ensure that wall assemblies for tile and stone finishes are designed and assembled to meet performance requirements, and all manufacturers of EQ studs will have the technical data needed for design and confirmation of performance requirements.

I am glad to learn you will be joining the NTCA.  As a member, you will find many benefits including tremendous networking and educational opportunities with many likeminded tile industry professionals looking to improve their level of performance and education based on tile industry standards. Other benefits include receiving a copy of the TCNA Handbook and the NTCA Reference Manual each year with your membership renewal.  I look forward to discussing membership with you next week when you call back.  In the meantime, please visit www.tile-assn.com for more information.  You can view additional member benefits at this link:  http://www.tile-assn.com/?page=Membership  you can also join by clicking on the “Join Now” link found anywhere on our website.

I hope this helps!

Mark Heinlein

NTCA Training Director

Tech Tip Tuesday: Q & A With NTCA Training Director Mark Heinlein

Member Question:

I have a job where we installed a porcelain tile. It is 8” x 15” and the side walls are fine but the wet walls are not good.  The worst part is they have that system of lighting where it is shining down directly from above so it shows all discrepancies and shadows. Is there anything in the industry standards that allows for a tolerance for a little lippage?

Mark’s Response:

Thank you for contacting the National Tile Contractors Association.

The standard for lippage is found in ANSI A108.02 Section 4 (copy attached) and is echoed in the TCNA Handbook.  Generally speaking, 1/32” in addition to the allowable warpage of a tile manufactured in accordance with ANSI A137.1 is the allowable lippage for wall mount mosaics with a grout joint width of 1/16 – 1/8”.

I understand these strip mosaics can be difficult and time consuming to install.  You are correct that substrate flatness is the place to start to help ensure the installed lippage is within tolerance.

The NTCA Reference Manual has an excellent section describing Wash Wall Lighting and how to avoid problems that can be associated with it.  If you have your Reference Manual at hand, it will provide some good reading on this topic.

The 2017 TCNA Handbook contains a section on Visual Inspection of Finished Tilework.  I don’t have my book close at hand but it is in the first 30-40 pages.  It may help your situation that visual inspection of wall installations is performed at 36” from the tilework.  Please take a look at that section in the Handbook and see if it can work for you in this case.

Please let me know if I can help with any further questions you might have after you are able to review the documents I listed above.

I hope this helps!

Mark Heinlein

NTCA Training Director

Tech Tip Tuesday: Q & A With NTCA Training Director Mark Heinlein

Member Question:

I need installation guidance to install a ceramic or porcelain tile over a concrete slab/sidewalk. This will be outside of a church and it is currently a concrete floor and curb. What would you recommend we use at the edge and expansion joints?

Mark’s Response:

There is a lot to consider before tiling a project like this one.  Since you may not have yet received your 2017 TCNA Handbook, I have attached a couple of photos of two methods (F101 and F102) that may be most applicable to your installation.

F101 describes an on ground concrete substrate with proper drainage below the slab, bonded mortar bed, ceramic tile and optional waterproofing / crack isolation membrane.

F102 describes an on ground concrete substrate with proper drainage below the slab, cementitious bond coat and optional waterproofing / crack isolation membrane.

Both of these methods will require proper drainage beneath the slab and drainage for surface water runoff from the finished surface and further drainage into the landscaping.  If the slab abuts a permanent structure, you will want to be certain that the drainage is slope away from the structure – the general rule would be 1/4” vertical slope per 12” of horizontal run.  Besides methods F101 and F102, there may be other methods and materials that will help with system drainage if that is an issue.

Prior to proceeding you will need to determine if this is a well cured slab and whether it is dimensionally stable and free of cracks, films, curing compounds, sealers, etc. and whether it’s surface has been at least steel troweled with a fine broom finish suitable for mortar to bond to it.  The flatness requirements of 1/4” per 10’ must be met for application of an F101 Thick Mortar Bed or for F102 direct bonding of tiles less than 15” on one side.  For direct bonding of tiles with one side 15” or longer the slab must meet the 1/8” per 10’ flatness requirement before the tile (or membrane) is to be set.

You will see that both of these methods list a membrane as optional.  Inclusion of a membrane will help with waterproofing above the substrate and a degree of crack isolation from minor existing or future in-plane cracks.  If the slab is abutted to a structure, I suggest looking for a way to flash the membrane up the side of the structure, potentially beneath the siding (if any).  The “Membrane Options” section of the method lists the specific membrane requirements and also points to Handbook methods F125-Partial / F125 – Full for crack isolation.

Some membrane manufacturers state that their membranes will be able to span certain types of joints if installed per their instructions and as part of a full system warranty (use of one manufacturer’s mortar, grout, membrane, sealant, etc.).  Installation of a membrane will help with waterproofing, some system drainage, and to protect against efflorescence from the substrate.

The “Materials” section defines the specifications for the tile and setting materials to be used in this method.

You are correct that this installation will need Movement Accommodation Joints.  TCNA Handbook Method EJ-171 provides the details.  As a minimum, those joints should be placed around the perimeter and at every change in plane or where the tile meets a different material.  Expansion joints in the concrete slab must be honored upward through the finished surface of the tile.  Expansion, Isolation, Construction, Contraction and other joints must be addressed.  For an exterior installation, joints throughout the tile field are required every 8’ – 12’ depending on materials and environmental conditions.  Appropriate joint width must also be determined based on environmental conditions the installation is expected to be subject to.  Sealants complying with ASTM C920 with an appropriate designation for this type of installation will be required for the soft joints.  As this is a traffic area, a sealant with a shore A hardness rating of 25 or greater should be considered.  Conversely, a manufactured joint may be available to use.  As we discussed in our workshop, it is the responsibility of the design professional or engineer to determine the location / placement / width / construction of these joints.  Method EJ-171 provides details on constituting these joints – but is too much information for me to forward in this e-mail.

Since this is an exterior installation with some potential of freeze/thaw cycling, expect there to be some system / component degradation over time that may require routine maintenance.

You will want to finish and protect the exposed edges of the tile with a commercially rated, durable metal trim such as brass or stainless steel. Bullnose, or tiles that have been custom bullnosed for the project may also work well depending on the expected use and conditions.

I hope this helps point you in the right direction.  You should have your new 2017 TCNA Handbook soon so you can refer to these methods and all of the other great guidance it contains.

Mark Heinlein

NTCA Training Director

TECH TIP TUESDAY: Q & A WITH NTCA TRAINING DIRECTOR MARK HEINLEIN

Contractor Question:

Mark,
I am thinking about putting a heating TapeMat in the floor of my bathroom.  The manufacturer’s literature suggests a modified thin-set mortar.  I am using a large format tile (12” x 24”).  I am placing the tile on a 3/4 inch plywood subfloor with a 1/4 inch Hardy board backer.  The floor is supported by 2”x12” floor joists spaced at 16” on center.  The bathroom is L shaped and is  8’x4’ with a 3’ L.  The 8’ wall is an exterior wall. Would an unmodified mortar work as well? Is it even advisable to use a modified mortar with a large format tile?

Mark’s Reply:

Thanks for the info.

Assuming ceramic/porcelain tile is being installed, the industry recognized method found in TCNA Handbook is RH135-16.  The method describes the details for an electric radiant heat system encapsulated in mortar over backer board on a plywood subfloor with joists 16” on center, which is the installation you have described.

It sounds like you are not installing a waterproofing membrane in the system.  In that case, the required thinset mortar for the cementitious bond coat is an ANSI A118.15.  In other words, an Improved Modified Dry-Set Cement Mortar is required.

The mortar you select should have the words “Meets ANSI A118.15” stamped on the package.  Be certain to carefully follow the mortar manufacturer’s instructions for the proper amount of water, mixing instructions, slaking time, open time, etc.

You asked whether it is advisable to use a modified mortar with a large format tile.  It is.  In fact, many manufacturers are now producing highly modified mortars specifically designed for Large and Heavy Tile.  You may find mortars labeled as “LHT” for this reason.  These mortars have specific properties to support the installation of large and heavy tiles on floors and walls.  Some allow for a thicker bond coat.  This is the type of mortar I would look for when installing an electrical heating tape mat system in the bond coat layer.

If you are using a membrane in the system, it may be advisable to use a less highly modified mortar (such as an A118.4) or even an unmodified thinset mortar (A118.1).  Check with the manufacturer of the membrane for their specific mortar recommendation.

Please make certain the surface of your plywood subfloor is flat to meet the industry standard tolerance of 1/8” in 10’ as required by ANSI A108 before you install the backer board.  This will ensure you have a flat finished tile surface on your large format tile installation.  Use a rapid setting patch material to fill low spots and a belt sander on the high spots of the plywood.  Do not use more or less thinset to help you flatten your installation while you set tile.  Doing so will prove problematic for you and your installation.

Membership in the National Tile Contractors Association is a valuable resource for any professional tile contractor or any contractor who installs tile.  NTCA is committed to improving installations and performance of contractors throughout the tile industry.  Our primary mission is training based on the tile industry standards I have described above.  Every installer should own and be familiar with the standards, methods and details that guide the tile industry.  I would be happy to discuss with you and your tile installation contractors the many benefits of membership in NTCA.  Please feel free to contact me, or Jim Olson at [email protected] for more information.  Also please visit our website at www.tile-assn.com.

The Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) supports education and training in the tile industry.  The Certified Tile Installer (CTI) program is a highly sought after certification for tile installers who wish to achieve a higher level of professionalism and recognition in the tile industry.  Please visit the CTEF website at https://www.ceramictilefoundation.org to locate a Certified Tile Installer or contact Kevin Insalato at [email protected] for more information on how a contractor can become a CTI.

I hope this helps.

Mark Heinlein, NTCA Training Director

 

Tech Tip Tuesday: Q & A With NTCA Technical Trainer Robb Roderick

QUESTION:

I have someone in Florida who is arguing that he has never heard of needing a crack suppression membrane for glass, particularly in pools. Can you suggest some verbiage here?

ANSWER: 

Thank you for contacting NTCA. On page 8 of the glass tile selection and installation guide in the TCNA handbook. It states, “glass tile is generally more vulnerable to crack propagation than ceramic tile. Where opacity allows, the glass tile manufacturer may recommend the use of a ANSI A118.12 crack isolation membrane for large format glass.

Also, on page 21 in the membrane selection guide, glass tile is listed as material in which  crack isolation membranes can eliminate cracks caused by in plane movement of the substrate.

On page 94 it shows method F125 for installation of crack isolation membranes. The handbook also shows Method P601 and P602 for pool and water features.

 

-Robb Roderick,

NTCA Technical Trainer

Tech Tip Tuesday – August 15, 2017

Q: Right now, I have engineered hardhoods that float over a concrete slab (second floor/above grade).  There have been water leak issues every one to two years usually in summer since I moved in 7 years ago, and no one seems able to fix it.  I’ve been told the water is getting in through the door, or from flashing outside, or from the slab below as water vapor, or that the aluminum slider is leaking/sweating, and that sunlight could also be making it worse.  I’ve never actually seen any water, even when the slab was exposed for several months two summers ago with frequent heavy DC thunderstorms (just a small area of wet concrete once and the discolored and cupping wood, which scrapes against the door).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What I hope to find is a solution that will work regardless of the moisture source.  I’m not a pro but propose cutting a square for an entryway there and installing outdoor rated porcelain tile (2 that are 12 x 24 or possibly 4 creating a two foot by four foot entry — although I prefer the smaller option).  The tiles would be surrounded by schluter strips, then the existing wood beyond that.  So here are my questions:

(1) Do you think that will work?
(2) If so, should I seal the concrete (maybe with Redgard), or will that make any potential water vapor migrate further into the unit and damage the hardwoods?  I’d rather have tile issues than wood issues at this point so I don’t have to replace the entire wood in that room.
(3) Any other advice?

 

A:

Thank you for contacting me at the National Tile Contractors Association.

You should not be seeing any water coming in through or under the door sill or into the concrete like this.  The problem of water entering the structure needs to be resolved before installing any floor surface.

In my opinion your problem could be with the door itself, or the installation of the door, or the installation of the deck and it’s framing, or the installation of flashing at the exposed edge of the slab, or any combination of these things.

I have seen this problem before. The subfloor kept getting saturated every time it rained.  The finish floor could not be installed.  The problem was improper installation of a very expensive door unit by the general contractor.  The contractor figured they had installed hundreds of doors and they didn’t need to follow the manufacturer instructions.  After numerous attempts to add more sealant and after removing and replacing the door at least two times, a manufacturer rep came onsite to monitor the installation a third time and, using the printed instructions for the door, directed the contractor on it’s installation.  Problem solved.  The door never leaked again.

Here’s a simple test you can try. Spray the door and sill with a hose or sprinkle water on it with a garden watering can to mimic rain.  Does water come in?  Does it come in under/through the sill?  Does it come in through the door sweep?  If it does, there is a problem with the door / sill and/or it’s installation.  Again, no water should come in under the sill or through the sweep or other door component.  I encourage you to contact the manufacturer of the door unit and obtain their original installation instructions and attempt to determine whether the door was properly installed.  You may have to have the door removed, examined, and reinstalled using the instructions to make this determination.

As you have already been advised, the water intrusion may be originating with the flashing (or lack of flashing) and/or the deck installation and/or the installation of the sill and door.  Water may indeed be gathering in the leading edge of the slab under the deck and becoming saturated and wicking into the top corner of the slab and up under the sill and into the subfloor area.   You need to have that issue properly examined and properly resolved.   I recommend hiring a recognized, licensed, experience, trusted general contractor and have them give you a proper inspection and strategy for correction.  Be prepared to have them remove some deck boards to see what’s going on there.

You need to get the problem fixed that is allowing the water intrusion before you make a decision as to what to do for the floor finish.

There are methods to go about installing the tile, but you don’t want to have water intrusion into your structure. If left unresolved it’s persistent presence may likely  create other, as yet unforeseen problems.

After you have resolved the water intrusion and decide that you’d like to install tile, please get back in touch and I can help point you in the right direction for a proper tile installation.

I hope this helps,

Mark Heinlein, NTCA Trainer/Presenter

 

Taking a look at the testing behind the tech: TCNA Lab active in new gauged porcelain tile standard

Traditionally, Tech Talk is a place to bring information of specific, practical tips for day-to-day tile installation. But this installment will focus on the technical work that goes on behind the scenes in the TCNA labs, which impacts testing, standards and other aspects of tile and associated products that contractors work with every day. This information was made public at Coverings in April.

TCNA Lab active in new gauged porcelain tile standard

When ANSI A137.3-2017 and A-108.19-2017 were approved recently, their 32 cumulative pages represented many hours of work on behalf of “thin tile” advocates across the globe. The science behind the standards, meanwhile, was provided by a tightly knit group based out of Anderson, S.C., who logged approximately 4,000 hours over six months to make the standard a reality.

“While a number of folks in the industry were absolutely critical in spearheading the thin tile project, and in keeping it moving forward at an incredibly rapid pace, there’s no question our lab played a decisive role in its eventual composition,” said Eric Astrachan, executive director, Tile Council of North America (TCNA). “In fact, our lab plays an integral role in the development of many of this industry’s standards – thin tile is just the latest example. We couldn’t develop consensus as we do today without the lab leading the way through their R&D efforts. We’re very proud of the work they do.”

TCNA Lab Technician Scott Davis (l.) reviews results with Claudio Bizzaglia. Testing and research conducted at the TCNA Lab contributes to the development of many tile (and related products) indus- try standards – the ANSI A137.3-2017 and A108.19-2017 gauged porcelain standards being the latest examples.

“Standards development is a challenging and interesting cross-disciplinary project for our staff,” said director of Laboratory Services Claudio Bizzaglia. “We have a standards team that attacks each particular standards project we work on, and then, depending on the nature of the project, we pull in specific additional staff members, depending on their specialties. The standards we’ve worked on recently or we’re working on now include a new surface abrasion method for ceramic tiles, multiple water absorption methods, various aspects of the glass tile standard, ongoing coefficient of friction studies, and the Robinson floor test method.”

“Having a diverse talent base to pull from here at TCNA is a tremendous asset in standards development and other industry-facing projects, just as it is for customer assignments,” Astrachan said. “With standards, the team has the additional benefit of knowing that they’re contributing something to an industry that we care very much about – and then, of course, it’s nice to have that expertise when it comes to helping our customers should a standard be ratified.”

 

Tech Talk – June 2017

Taking a look at the testing behind the tech: TCNA Lab and its contribution to the industry

Traditionally, Tech Talk is a place to bring information of specific, practical tips for day-to-day tile installation. But this installment will focus on a lot of the technical work that goes on behind the scenes in the TCNA labs, which impact testing, standards and other aspects of tile and associated products that contractors work with every day. This information was made public at Coverings in April.

TCNA Lab active in New gauged porcelain tile standard

When ANSI A137.3-2017 and A-108.19-2017 were approved recently, their 32 cumulative pages represented many hours of work on behalf of “thin tile” advocates across the globe. The science behind the standards, meanwhile, was provided by a tightly-knit group based out of Anderson, S.C., who logged approximately 4,000 hours over six months to make the standard a reality.

“While a number of folks in the industry were absolutely critical in spearheading the thin tile project, and in keeping it moving forward at an incredibly rapid pace, there’s no question our lab played a decisive role in its eventual composition,” said Eric Astrachan, executive director, Tile Council of North America (TCNA). “In fact, our lab plays an integral role in the development of many of this industry’s standards – thin tile is just the latest example. We couldn’t develop consensus as we do today without the lab leading the way through their R&D efforts. We’re very proud of the work they do.”

“Standards development is a challenging and interesting cross-disciplinary project for our staff,” said director of Laboratory Services Claudio Bizzaglia. “We have a standards team that attacks each particular standards project we work on, and then, depending on the nature of the project, we pull in specific additional staff members, depending on their specialties. The standards we’ve worked on recently or we’re working on now include a new surface abrasion method for ceramic tiles, multiple water absorption methods, various aspects of the glass tile standard, ongoing coefficient of friction studies, and the Robinson floor test method.”

“Having a diverse talent base to pull from here at TCNA is a tremendous asset in standards development and other industry-facing projects, just as it is for customer assignments,” Astrachan says. “With standards, the team has the additional benefit of knowing that they’re contributing something to an industry that we care very much about – and then, of course, it’s nice to have that expertise when it comes to helping our customers should a standard be ratified.”

TCNA Lab Technician Scott Davis (l.)  reviews results with Claudio Bizzaglia. Testing and research conducted at the TCNA Lab contributes to the development of many tile (and related products) industry standards—the ANSI A137.3-2017 and A108.19-2017 “thin tile” standards being the latest examples. 

IAS Grants ISO 17025 Accreditation to TCNA Lab; Bizzaglia elected chairman of ISO TC 189 committee

The International Accreditation Service (IAS), a non-profit, public benefit corporation and internationally-recognized accreditation body based in the United States, has accredited the Laboratory Services department of the Tile Council of North America (TCNA) in all of the methods the lab submitted to IAS. Forty-five separate methods were submitted, including those most central and relevant to tile and installation materials testing.

This accreditation – a voluntary, third-party review process — underscores the Lab’s acquisition of numerous “seals of approval” from a panoply of North America’s largest corporate entities following evaluation based on their individual standards and practices.

“Our team worked very hard to make this accreditation possible, and our success is the result of their professionalism, as well as excellent teamwork,” says director of Lab Services Claudio Bizzaglia. “We look forward to retaining our accreditation and perhaps gaining additional accreditations this summer.”

The accreditation comes at a time of exponential growth for the TCNA Lab, whose revenues have more than tripled in over the past five years, growing consistently since 2009, with major growth since 2013. Bizzaglia attributes the growth to the lab’s results-driven professional environment, a recommitment to customer care and customer service, an expanded sales effort, and, as he says, “a little bit of luck.”

Bizzaglia also counts this growth as a big achievement, as are the result good practices of precision and recordkeeping demonstrated by the tightly-scheduled lab, which contributed to ISO accreditation, and to customer satisfaction.

TCNA Lab Technicians Nicole Spandley and Damon McDowell testing the shear bond strength of thin set mortar on the Instron Universal Tester according to the ANSI A118 method, one of the many market-relevant test methods in which the TCNA Lab is ISO17025 accredited.

In addition, Bizzaglia was elected chairman of the ISO TC189 Committee. He will succeed the venerable Dr. Svend Hovmand, former president and former chairman of the board of Crossville, Inc.

Hovmand has served and is currently serving on numerous industry boards of directors, including those of the Ceramic Tile Education Foundation, Porcelain Tile Certification Agency, Coverings, and Tile Council of North America. Bizzaglia will become chair on January 1, 2018.

Hovmand praised Bizzaglia’s extensive international work experience developing laboratory methods and standards and many roles in the tile industry, which includes experience in manufacturing and nearly 10 years leading TCNA’s lab.

“It’s an honor to represent TCNA and serve the industry on this international committee,” Bizzaglia said. “Stepping into this role following Svend will not be easy, but I hope to be up to the challenge.”

Claudio Bizzaglia, TCNA’s director of Laboratory Services, has been elected to chair ISO’s Technical Committee TC189 beginning January 1, 2018. This committee develops voluntary, consensus-based standards for ceramic tiles and related installation materials, including grouts, adhesives, and membranes.

TCNA works to coordinate Global Lab Network

Another aspect of Bizzaglia’s work has been completing several rounds of conversation regarding the assembly of a Global Lab Network.

The goals of the Network include establishing standards for precision in test methods among its affiliates, as well as accepted norms for responsiveness and overall service, while also providing forums for best practices, problem-solving, and networking, Bizzaglia says. “We feel that intercontinental cooperation will be of great benefit to the scientific community – not only from a pure scientific standpoint, but from a business standpoint,” Bizzaglia said.

The Global Lab Network can provide trusted lab resources for colleagues in other countries seeking referrals to a lab in the U.S. or around the world. In addition, it may be a vehicle to bring “education and understanding in lesser developed regions that penetrates into the marketplace,” Bizzaglia noted. “It is possible that through reaching out on scientific matters, we may be able to assist producers, not always in compliance with international standards, and provide some help and assistance. We have had good results with this type of engagement before.”

To date, the Network has commitments from the TCNA Lab, which operates facilities in both the US and Mexico, as well as a lab in Brazil. Plans are underway to engage European facilities in the Network.

TCNA Lab technician Tracy Williams measures the warpage, facial and thickness dimensions, and the wedging of a ceramic tile according to ASTM C485, ASTM C499, and ASTM C502.

Tech Talk – May 2017

New ANSI Gauged Porcelain/“Thin Tile” Standards debut at Coverings

More than four years of cross-disciplinary industry collaboration and 4,000-plus hours of research from the TCNA Laboratory Services team have culminated in the announcement at Coverings of two new standards: ANSI A137.3, the American National Standard Specifications for Gauged Porcelain Tiles and Gauged Porcelain Tile Panels/Slabs, and its companion, ANSI A108.19, Interior Installation of Gauged Porcelain Tiles and Gauged Porcelain Tile Panels/Slabs by the Thin-Bed Method bonded with Modified Dry-Set Cement Mortar or Improved Modified Dry-Set Cement Mortar.

Currently known in industry parlance as the “thin tile” standards, the standards use the term“gauged” to cover a range of precise thicknesses that can carry different loads and be used in different ways, taking a similar approach to standardized wire gauges and gauged sheet metal. Two classes of gauged tile products are defined—those for wall applications from 3.5 to 4.9 mm and for floor and wall applications from 5.0 to 6.5 mm.

ANSI A137.3 standardizes the minimum required properties for the products themselves and ANSI A108.19 standardizes the methodologies for installing the products in interior installations by the thin-bed method with specific mortars.

These standards, developed for the benefit of all tile consumers, are the result of a multi-year consensus process of the ANSI Accredited A108 Standards Committee, which maintains a broad and diverse group of participants reflecting stakeholder interests in all aspects of the tile industry.

“Interest in gauged tiles has been growing exponentially the last few years,” says Eric Astrachan, executive director, Tile Council of North America (TCNA), which serves as secretariat of the committee. “Such growth encourages more products to enter the marketplace, but without standards tile consumers would have no way to know what to expect in terms of performance.

Installers especially were asking for standards to allow for installation practices to be developed based on consistent tile properties. Without such, it was feared that problems resulting from an undefined range of products could have hindered growth of this exciting market segment. We are very pleased to announce these standards today and congratulate and thank the many across our industry that worked for years on their development. We hope these standards, the first of their kind in the world, will help lead the way forward to international gauged tile standards.”

A free download of a preview copy is available from TCNA at www.tileusa.com, and a professional publication of both standards will be available for purchase from TCNA in July.

Tech Talk – April 2017

A tour through NTCA’s “Innovative Tools” Coverings 2017 presentation

An array of tools that make tiling easier, safer and more efficient will be on display

By Lesley Goddin

This year, at Coverings ’17 (taking place as this book is going to press), NTCA technical trainers/presenters Mark Heinlein and Robb Roderick are conducting a Coverings Conference session called “Innovative Tools in the Tile Industry.” In addition, the session will be presented in Spanish by NTCA technical trainer Luis Bautista, and David Allen Company’s Marcos Castillo. NTCA training and education coordinator Becky Serbin will also be on hand at the session.

The session explores a number of tools available in the industry right now and their benefits. For our Tech Talk section this issue, we are presenting a synopsis of the tools that will be presented in this session, along with photos and the URL, so you can research them on their own and see how they might enhance your installation experience or efficiency.

Several of the products selected for the session offer tremendous innovation in the ability to remove dust, especially in light of OSHA’s new requirements for limiting the amount of crystalline silica in the workplace. These new safety standards are to go in to place this summer. These include the iQTS244 dry-saw, and Alpha Tool’s HEPA Dry Vacuum and Ecoguard series of dust collection devices.
The iQTS244 10″ tile saw from iQ Power Tools is a dry-cut saw with a vacuum attached on the bottom. This saw makes precise cuts in a dust-free environment without the use of water. NTCA technical trainer/presenter Robb Roderick said, “Traditional wet saws have a tendency to spray water around the jobsite, which is why they are normally set up outside or in a garage. This saw works great in freezing temperatures where wet saws would have difficulty.” www.iQpowertools.com

 

Alpha Professional Tools offers the Alpha® Hepa Dry Vacuum, with an extra-large capacity HEPA filter system and a power 2-hp motor. The drop-in HEPA filter is individually certified to have a minimum efficiency of 99.97% at .3 microns. Alpha is updating this vacuum, and a new model will be available in the near future.

 

In addition, Alpha offers the Ecoguard series of dust collection devices (pictured is the Ecoguard EG, an Economy Grinding Dust Collection Cover for larger grinders, fitting most 6” to 8” grinders). When connected to an industrial vacuum the Ecoguard EG moves easily and creates a virtually dust-free grinding experience. Roderick said, “Cutting and grinding creates a lot of dust which can have adverse effects in the user, and require extensive amounts of efforts cleaning up the mess. These products help eliminate those issues.” www.alphatools.com

 

When it comes to mixers, the RUBITOOLS’ Rubimix -9 electric mixer offers a configuration that is more comfortable to the user for mixing thin-set and grout than that offered by traditional  drills, Roderick said. It also has adjustable speed setting allowing you to use it to mix multiple types of products with one mixer. The versatile mixer allows mixing adhesives, resins, paints and other materials by changing the mixing paddle. Its double grip with bi-material handles has improved ergonomics and greater user comfort.

RUBI also has developed a rubber graduated RUBI-KANGURO “ITALIANO” bucket, which is easily cleaned and has greater longevity. Roderick noted that traditionally tile installers have used plastic buckets to mix thinset or grout. “To be used again, the buckets must be cleaned daily,” he said. “Because of the rigidity of the plastic after thin-set or grout hardened, the dried materials are nearly impossible to removewithout damaging the bucket. These buckets are rubber and much more easily cleaned when setting materials have dried in them.” The buckets have reinforcing ribs and a base and mouth which are designed to make the bucket very structurally robust. www.rubi.com.


Gundlach is distributing a new Montolit Masterpiuma P3 cutter– and it’s Montolit’s #1 bestselling cutter. “This cutter has gotten rave review on several tile-related Facebook sites, because  of its ease of use and its ability to cut virtually every type of tile available,” Roderick said. “Many of our members are amazed at how well it works.”


It can cut all types of tile quickly and accurately, ranging from thicknesses of 0-22mm. It even makes cutting on a diagonal safe and simple. It features an accurate, powerful and effective ergonomic push scrib handle, a self-adjustable patented scoring system and easy, fast set-up, transport and storage due to the patented foldable design. Adaptable for large-format tiles as well. www.montolit.com

Not every tile line offers bullnose pieces for finished edges. But the Raimondi Bull Dog™ bullnose machines, made by Raimondi and distributed by Donnelly Distribution LLC, allows installers to make custom bullnose pieces of porcelain or stone easy. The pump-cooled machine bullnoses and bevels, offering rough, finished and polished levels of finishing. www.raimondiusa.com

 

Another product from Raimondi is the Raimondi Maxititina Multi-Functional Floor Machine with Grouting Paddle. While this is not a NEW machine, it is innovative in that it allows contractors to grout a floor without kneeling, clean a floor, or grind/scarify or prepare subfloors to improve the bond. It allows installers to level out high spots on concrete, and power grout a job at 55 rpm, spreading the grout and packing the joints full. It also can seal floors in a jiffy, and polish them to a desired level of shine, at 110 rpm.

 

Also useful is the Berta by Raimondi which has a large replaceable sponge drum which rotates to clean freshly-grouted floors, which is a major time saver on large floor installations.

Finally, with dimensions of tile growing larger and larger, the ETM Grip by European Tile Masters facilitates handling and back-buttering of gauged porcelain panels. It has 12 fully-adjustable suction cups and four adjustable handles, can be configured to multiple lengths (up to 10’) and multiple shapes (including U and Z shapes), and can be tilted from 90 to 15-degree angles. The ETM Grip allows two people to move and manage today’s larger format tiles with ease. www.europeantilemasters.com

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