New Regional Evaluators expand CTI Certification opportunities

New Regional Evaluators expand CTI Certification opportunities

As of TISE West/Surfaces, there are 10 new Regional Evaluators at your service for the Ceramic  Tile Education Foundation’s (CTEF)  Certified Tile Installer (CTI)  Certification program. That means that installers no longer need wait until classes reach 10 or more students before they are able to take the hands-on portion of the exam and achieve industry-recognized certification and validation of skills and knowledge.

Qualified labor, like CTI Certification and the Advanced Certifications for Tile Installers (ACT), has been included in the MasterSpec and is being specified by more members of the A&D community.

Brad Denny (l.) and Dave Rogers are two new CTI Regional Evaluators.

The CTI test consists of a written, open-book, 155 question, multiple-choice exam that can be taken online and a live, in-person, hands-on test, which is monitored and assessed by Regional Evaluators. In it, installers must demonstrate their ability to execute a complex layout and proper installation of vapor retarder membrane, backer board, tile (walls and floors), cementitious grout, and flexible sealant (caulk). For each installation material, the applicant is scored on the various aspects of workmanship relevant to producing an installation that will endure use and satisfy the discriminating client.

Those who pass both parts of the exam receive a CTI certificate, plastic wallet ID card, CTI logo for use on cards, vehicles, websites and other marketing materials, consumer brochures and a listing on the CTEF website.  Any installer who has had at least two years of verifiable experience as the lead installer setting ceramic tile on a full-time basis is eligible to take the CTI exam. Study materials are supplied for those undergoing the test.

Led by Regional Evaluator coordinator Kevin Insalato, this troupe of Regional Evaluators now includes:

  • Brad Denny, Nichols Tile & Terrazzo – Joelton, Tenn.
  • Dan Hecox, Hecox Construction – York, Neb.
  • Joe Kerber at Kerber Tile – Shakopee, Minn.
  • Matt Newbold, Elite tile Setters – Lehi Utah.
  • Dave Rogers, Welch Tile – Kent City, Mich.
  • Tom Cravillion, Cravillion Tile – Plymouth, Wis.
  • Triniti Vigil, J&R Tile – San Antonio Texas.
  • Rafael Lopez, California Flooring – Manteno, Ill.
  • Mark Heinlein, NTCA trainer
  • Robb Roderick , NTCA trainer

In addition, Scott Carothers, director of Training and Certification for CTEF, is conducting CTI exams, with plans to concentrate on and grow  ACT certifications in the future. This team of evaluators has expanded the opportunities for CTI certification. The current schedule of CTI certifications is as follows:

  • February 21 – Heuler Tile, Pewaukee, WI
  • March 10 –CTEF Facility, Pendleton, SC
  • March 17 –ISC Surfaces, Kansas City, KS
  • March 18 – The Tile Shop, Lombard, Ill.
  • April 4-6 –Coverings ’17, Orlando, FL
  • April 25 – Fire Keepers Casino, Battle Creek, MI.
  • May 12 – CTEF Facility, Pendleton, SC
  • May 19 – ISC Surfaces, Kansas City, KS
  • July 14 – CTEF Facility, Pendleton, SC
  • September 15 – CTEF Facility, Pendleton, SC
  • September 22 – ISC Surfaces, Kansas City, KS
  • November 17 – CTEF Facility, Pendleton, SC
  • December 8 –ISC Surfaces, Kansas City, KS

There are two more March testing dates in regional locales in Utah and San Antonio awaiting approval.

Visit the CTEF website at https://www.ceramictilefoundation.o

CTI Regional Evaluator coordinator Kevin Insalato (r.) with NTCA assistant executive director Jim Olson during TISE West/Surfaces 2017.

rg/events to check the calendar for new locations and CTI test opportunities as they become available; and this site to https://www.ceramictilefoundation.org/certified-tile-installer-cti-program to learn more about becoming a Certified Tile Installer.

Managing mold in stone showers

Mold is a destructive organism that can overtake grout, stone and tile in showers and wet areas, rendering them not simply unsightly, but also unhygienic.

Sometimes mold is superficial and resides only on the surface of the installation. Most shampoos and soaps contain organic matter, some more than others .When you have organic materials, warm temperatures and moisture, you have a great environment for mold to grow.

Proper and regular cleaning of showers removes those materials. When used and not cleaned regularly you can end up with discoloration on grouts, stone and tile. Always use a neutral PH cleaners approved for cleaning the stone or tile in your shower. And always test the cleaner in a inconspicuous area to make sure there’s no adverse reactions.

Double check for mold or wet areas outside the shower as well to ensure there are no leaks. If water has escaped the shower assembly and has reached the wood substructure this can also provide the organic matter needed for mold to grow. – Robb Roderick, NTCA trainer/presenter

Tech Tip: Watch Out for Your Bottom Line with Commercial Bids

Robb Roderick

Robb Roderick, NTCA Trainer

Large commercial tile installation jobs require a bit of extra consideration when preparing a bid. In addition to requiring a lot of paperwork, state or federally funded commercial jobs will have minimum wage requirements. Large commercial jobs also require attention to detail as very small changes can cost thousands of dollars. Making sure you have a list of exclusions can help you avoid problems associated with unclear specifications.

Exclusions might include:

  • Nights and weekend work. Most commercial builders receive bonuses for completing jobs early and will push as hard as they can to get you done as soon as possible. Paying overtime to your people can unexpectedly drain all the profit out of your job.
  • Pattern work. If you bid for a 12×12 straight install and arrive to the job site to find the designer has changed the pattern to a 45 degree with dots, this will hurt your bottom line.
  • Surface preparation. On all estimates, be sure to include a line that states, “All surfaces to receive tile must meet the TCNS standard of no deviation of more than 1/4” in a 10′ radius. If the surfaces do not meet this standard additional preparation will be required that is not reflected in this estimate.”
  • Natural stone, glass tile, specialty grouts, grout sealer, and sealer labor. Anyone who has been an installer for very long has had an easy job turn into a difficult one because someone made a change half way through the project.

Having these exclusions written into your contract can help you get a change order and get paid for the changes instead of losing the money out of your own pocket. This may go without saying, but it is very important to read your contract thoroughly. If there is something you don’t understand or agree with, be sure to call the builder on that. Many builders will have you cross out or rewrite contracts that don’t meet your standards. Don’t be afraid to do this! Many contracts are written to give the builder all the protection, leaving you out in the cold.

The last thing to consider is becoming an NTCA Five Star Contractor. Many architects see the need for qualified labor and they are beginning to specify that the tile contractor must be certified by the Certified Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) or be an NTCA Five Star Contractor. I first saw this specification a few years back in my part of the country. It seems to be more common place with each year. If your the only one in your area with these credentials, you may be compensated for your better quality work.

TECH TIP: Is Your Floor or Wall Flat Enough for Large Format Tile?

How prepared are you for installing Large Format Tile (LFT) and ensuring you have a surface that is adequately flat? It’s a big deal and worth considering before you get started.

Large Format Tile is growing significantly!

Tile sizes are increasing. Large format tile has grown from the old 8” x 8” to 12” x 12”, 12” x 24”, 24″ x 48″ and beyond. You’ll even find Gauged Porcelain Tile (GPT) and Gauged Porcelain Tile Panels/Slabs (GPTPS) ranging from 1 meter x 3 meters (roughly 39” x 10’) up to 1-1/2 meters x 3 meters (almost 5’ x 10’).

Not only are sizes increasing, but larger sized tiles have been fully embraced by home and building owners and specifiers.

As a result, tile installers must know how to accommodate inherent warpage associated with large format tile, as well as how to provide (and get paid for doing so) a surface that will allow these products to be installed without lippage or at least within the allowable tolerances provided in the ANSI documents.

>> See Do You Have Enough Mortar to Accommodate Most Tile Warpage?

The ANSI Standard for Subfloor Surfaces, ANSI A108.02-4.1.4.3.1, states in part:

“For tiles with at least one edge 15” or longer, the maximum allowable variation is not more than 1/8” in 10’ and no more than 1/16” in 2’ from the required plane, when measured from the high points in the surface.”

How to determine the condition of the floor or wall?

Determining the condition of the floor or wall is relatively easy by using a ten foot straightedge.

Simply mark the substrate with some method such as circling the low spots and placing an X on the high spots to quickly show where the work is needed to meet the ANSI specification.

Then, use a combination of cementitious patching compound (either trowel applied or self-leveling) to fill the low spots and grind down the high spots. This will normally provide a surface that will be suitable for installing tile within the prescribed tolerances.

By the way, you should never use thin-set or large and heavy tile (formerly medium bed) mortars to flatten the surface.

Use a long straightedge to determine if the trowel applied patch is flat enough for large format tile.

Notice in the image above taken during an Advanced Certifications for Tile Installers (ACT) test, how the installer is using a long straightedge to determine if the trowel applied patch is flat enough to receive a 12” x 24” porcelain tile with a 1/8” grout joint and still be within the lippage requirements.

Realize that the allowable lippage for this tile installation under ANSI Specification A108.02- 4.3.7 is just 1/32” (about the thickness of a credit card).

Before installing large format tile, look at the surface! Is it flat enough?

Before starting your next job, look carefully at the surface that is to receive tile. What will it take to make it flat enough to install large format tile? Identifying how and requesting a change order before the job starts increases your chances of getting paid for the quality work you have provided.

And, don’t even think of trying to “fix” the floor or wall surface as you go with thin-set mortar! That will almost always result in an unsatisfactory finished product.

Do your customer and yourself a favor, do it right… the first time.

Thanks for reading,

Scott

Florida Tile CEO named TCNA president

franceschelli-_-nov-2016Mike Franceschelli, CEO of Florida Tile, Inc., since 2010, was recently named president of Tile Council of North America, for a two-year term. He’s led the company to steady growth in sales and profits while also expanding their manufacturing and distribution capabilities.

Franceschelli has taken an active role in TCNA, serving four years as 2nd vice president before accepting his current post. His commitment to raising the bar in the tile industry is reflected in the goals that he has set for himself and TCNA for the coming year.

“Developing a TCNA ‘Why Tile’ program to educate consumers and the industry on the many benefits of tile is high on my list of priorities,” says Franceschelli. “It’s important to lead this charge of informing the public and training our industry professionals in order to make a positive impact in the flooring market.”

His list of objectives for the coming year highlight the ambition and dedication he and TCNA have for the tile industry.

Develop the TCNA “Why Tile” program to inform consumers and the industry regarding the health, safety, environmental, cost, and design benefits of tile

Work with labor organizations to support career training and certification programs

Continue to facilitate the development of standards to better define technical product performance and to inform consumers about the safe use of tile surfaces

Maintain the collaboration of the TCNA Handbook Committee and the publication of installation details relevant to today’s products and practices

Promote further collaboration with other major trade organizations including CTDA, NTCA and TCAA

Develop an even stronger bond between members in the US and Canada and their TCNA colleagues in Mexico

Promote cooperation within the global tile manufacturing communities in Italy, Spain, Brazil and around the world

Contribute on an international basis to ISO standards

Qualified Labor – December 2016

ctiCertification: providing a bridge to the larger tile community for Charles Nolen, Miller’s Flooring America

By Terryn Rutford, Social Structure Marketing

Charles Nolen was recently named an Indiana State Ambassador for the National Tile Contractor’s Association (NTCA), an adjunct role to his position with Miller’s Flooring America, which does all types of flooring installation in Lafayette, Ind. In 2016, after more than 20 years in the industry, Nolen became a Certified Tile Installer (CTI) at Coverings 16 this past April.

nolen-1Nolen said, “The written test was very interesting for me. It made me really get into my books. I have had all the books for years, but I just didn’t get that deep into the coefficient of friction side of things.” Nolen’s tile installations have always closely followed the TCNA Handbook, but he said, “Clients seem to really like the [CTI] logo and confirmation they made the right decision.”

Nolen said being certified is, “A way to say I’m different. I don’t just tile, I make a project come to life, bringing people’s dreams to reality, not just at the surface. What is underneath is done just as correctly as what you see visually. Tile isn’t just a designer object, it’s a tile assembly that must function with the consumer in mind for years to come.”

Tile certification is a way to confirm to consumers the quality of a company’s craftsmanship and workmanship. Nolen’s company already has a great reputation for “coming in, demoing, and redoing work,” he said. “Certification lets them know they have come to the right place and they definitely seem to relax and breathe knowing they will get better results.”

The biggest change for Nolen since becoming certified has been his connection to the larger tile community. Nolen said, “I have reached out to many peers in the business, joining [the] Tile Geeks [Facebook Group] and networking with those who have truly paved the way in the tile world.”

Certification is one of the most important advances being made in the industry as a whole, Nolen said. It is a way for the Ceramic Tile Education Foundation, “to put the stamp on [the industry] and say, ‘Hey look, there are great installers out there’.” Certification opened up a lot of doors for Nolen, only the most recent of which was becoming the NTCA’s Indiana State Ambassador. “Being able to display the logo and holding the card is priceless,” Nolen said.

nolen-3

 

Business Tip – December 2016

mapei_sponsorObamacare: the road to repeal

By Pat O’Connor,
Kent and O’Connor, Washington, D.C.

pat-oconnor

For the past six years, “Repeal Obamacare” has been a potent mantra, a rallying cry that energized Republicans and turned out voters. The Republican-controlled House churned out repeal legislation on a regular basis, passing over 50 repeal bills! Yet, with President Obama’s veto pen always looming, repeal was never going to happen and everyone knew it.

Only now, with the stunning upset victory of Donald Trump for president, is repeal of the massive and controversial health care bill suddenly real. Republicans control the White House and both chambers in Congress. The expectation for bold action from the Republican base is very high. Does this mean repeal of Obamacare will be a done deal in the first 100 days?

Not necessarily. In fact, the road ahead for Obamacare repeal is complicated.

Practical realities

First are the practical realities of the legislative process. Republicans are in control, but they don’t have the 60 votes needed in the Senate to overcome a filibuster, a tactic Democrats would emphatically employ to block any repeal legislation.

Of course, Republican leaders can get around this by repealing key parts of the health care law through the “budget reconciliation” process, a special procedure that only requires a simple majority vote. (That is the same process used by Democrats to pass The Affordable Care Act [ACA] in the first place.) Still, budget reconciliation takes time, requiring passage of budget resolutions and other procedural niceties, and it does not allow for total repeal. While it is a likely vehicle for ACA repeal, it will be neither quick nor clear cut.

Executive and administrative options

Legislative avenues aside, the new president will have any number of administrative options to block, change or suspend key elements of the law. For example, he can cut off funding for cost-sharing subsidies to insurers (which did not have explicit appropriations and is being challenged in courts by House Republicans). Experts agree this action alone would shut down the health exchanges. Or, he could simply stop enforcing penalties for the individual mandate or for employers who fail to provide affordable coverage.

Then what?

Yet, any of these paths to repeal or cripple the ACA ignore a fundamental question: Then what?

For good or ill, the ACA has taken root. It touches the lives of every American. The entire health care industry – from hospitals to doctors to insurance companies and other providers – has adapted and reshaped dramatically in response to the health care law. Twenty-two million people depend on Obamacare for their health insurance. Will a new President Trump really want to begin his presidency stripping health insurance from millions of Americans and upending one-fifth of the economy?

That’s why the “repeal” chants shifted to “repeal and replace” over a year ago – a subtle acknowledgement that something has to take the place of Obamacare. But up until now, “repeal and replace” has been little more than a slogan, with only the broadest outlines of what the replacement might be and little analysis of the impact. As a result, Republicans are split over what direction to take. Some want immediate repeal, others see a more deliberate approach as necessary to avoid major upheaval for both insured individuals and insurance markets.

The model for “repeal and replace” can be seen in the plan passed last December by both the House and Senate through budget reconciliation (and vetoed by President Obama). It eliminated the expansion of Medicaid coverage for Americans near or below the poverty line, eliminated the subsidies for Americans to buy their own insurance on the ACA exchanges, eliminated the penalties on individuals for not being insured and on employers for not providing affordable coverage. The measure delayed the effective date for two years to allow Congress to figure out the “replace” part of the equation.

This template reveals a simple truth: dismantling Obamacare is easy – whether through Executive action, budget reconciliation or a combination of the two. The daunting political and policy challenge is finding an alternative that works.

President-elect Trump says he wants to preserve the two most popular features of Obamacare: guaranteed coverage to people with pre-existing conditions (without being overcharged) and allowing young people up to age 26 to be covered on a parent’s plan. Yet, the guaranteed coverage provision is costly to insurers and without the other interconnected carrots and sticks (such as the individual mandate and the premium subsidies that brings healthy patients into the marketplace), premiums will spike, potentially leaving insurance markets in even greater disarray. This is the conundrum that Trumpcare, like its predecessor, must contend with.

Companies should remain cautious as they look ahead, allowing events to unfold before deciding on a change in benefits strategy. No doubt, Obamacare is on its way out. But don’t be surprised if it lingers a bit longer than expected.

Pat O’Connor is a principal in Kent & O’Connor, Incorporated, a Washington, D.C.-based government affairs firm. A veteran of Capitol Hill with particular expertise in health, transportation and the environment, O’Connor works with trade associations and companies to find workable solutions to the most pressing regulatory and legislative issues. For more information, visit www.kentoconnor.com or call 202-223-6222.

Ask the Experts – December 2016

SponsoredbyLaticreteQUESTION

We have a contractor who used two different tiles. He bought the 4” x 4” tile elsewhere but after installation it appears to have changed color. The tile he bought from another source at the bottom, stayed looking like it did prior to installation. What could have caused this?

ANSWER

glazed-wall-tile-ateThe color of some tiles can change with grouting, for example this can occur with soft, natural stones and unglazed, honed or polished through-body ceramic/porcelain or quarry tiles (and/or if grout release wasn’t used).

It appears the tiles shown in this installation are glazed ceramic. You stated the two sizes of tile were procured from two different distributors. It is possible that even if the tiles are from the same manufacturer they may have been manufactured on different dates or in different lots. That being the case, the glaze may have a slight variation between the two. The glaze also appears to be different on the bullnose tile.

If spare, uninstalled 4” x 4” and 3” x 6” tiles from this job, new from their cartons, are placed side by side, I suspect you may notice the difference in color between them. Have you checked to see if the two tiles are from the same manufacturer and what their date of manufacture and manufacturer lot numbers are? This information should be available on the end flaps of the tile cartons. If the manufacturer, date of manufacture or lot numbers differ, there may well have been a difference in glaze color out of the box that wasn’t noticed until the tiles were installed and grouted

It is important to verify that all of this information aligns between all cartons of tile before beginning the installation.

Mark Heinlein – CTI #1112, NTCA Technical Trainer/Presenter

QUESTION

I need to know what the TCNA standard for slope in a commercial kitchen is.

ANSWER

The minimum slope for floor drains is 1/4” as specified by ANSI A108.01 2.2, which directs compliance with ANSI A112.21. The Universal Plumbing Code also specifies minimum slope of 1/4” per 12”.

The mortar bed is to be of a uniform thickness. ANSI A108.01 2.6.1.4 and 2.6.1.5 include a chart and discussion of minimum and maximum mortar bed thicknesses based on the service rating of the floor. For a commercial kitchen rated as Extra Heavy/Heavy, the bed thickness is 2-1/2” minimum to 3-1/2” maximum. Appropriate size and gauge galvanized welded wire mesh (i.e. 2” x 2” 16 gauge) must be suspended as reinforcing wire in the mortar bed. If the mortar bed will be in excess of 3-1/2” thick, heavier reinforcing, larger aggregate, richer mix and greater compaction may be required and must be detailed by the specifier.

To keep the mortar bed from becoming too thick or the slopes to a drain too long, multiple drain locations should be planned based on the layout of the kitchen.

Mark Heinlein – CTI #1112, NTCA Technical Trainer/Presenter

Qualified Labor – November 2016

ctiNTCA Nebraska State Ambassador establishes local CTI testing

In January 2016, National Tile Contractor’s Association (NTCA) Nebraska State Ambassador Dan Hecox attended ARDEX Academy in Mansfield, Texas. When he arrived he found the majority of the students were from Nebraska and Iowa. “I started talking with everyone about the NTCA,” Hecox said. “That led to a discussion about holding Certified Tile Installer testing in Nebraska.” At the time, there had never been a Certified Tile Installer (CTI) testing in Nebraska.

At Sark Tile, Lincoln, Neb., are (l. to r.): Oleg Ketrar; Tyson Skinner; John Calderwood; Tim Hufman; Randy Stroud; James Chamberlain – all of Rainwood Interiors; Mark Becher (owner of Sark Tile); Dan Hecox; and Scott Carothers.

At Sark Tile, Lincoln, Neb., are (l. to r.): Oleg Ketrar; Tyson Skinner; John Calderwood; Tim Hufman; Randy Stroud; James Chamberlain – all of Rainwood Interiors; Mark Becher (owner of Sark Tile); Dan Hecox; and Scott Carothers.

The CTI class at Sark Tile, in process.

The CTI class at Sark Tile, in process.

Hecox himself was the first CTI in Nebraska. He took the CTI at Coverings in April 2016. After that, Hecox could not have succeeded without NTCA executive director Bart Bettiga and Ceramic Tile Education Foundation (CTEF) director of certification and training Scott Carothers. “When I mentioned wanting to become an evaluator, Bart said that Scott had a lot on his plate and it would be good to take pressure off of him,” Hecox said. Hecox went to South Carolina and trained with Carothers to become a CTI evaluator.

Mike Sima from Midtown Tile in Papillion, Neb., took the test at Sunderland Brothers Company and said the best thing about the experience was “the information and the education...Learning is a huge part of this industry.”

Mike Sima from Midtown Tile in Papillion, Neb., took the test at Sunderland Brothers Company and said the best thing about the experience was “the information and the education…Learning is a huge part of this industry.”

“In March, the NTCA held a workshop at Daltile in Omaha with Mark Heinlein, and we officially started signing people up,” Hecox said. “Then it was just a lot of phone calls to get everyone motivated to take the test.” Nebraska’s first CTI testing  saw six local installers test at Sark Tile in Lincoln, Neb., on August 19th. The second CTI testing was held at Sunderland Brothers Company on August 26th in Omaha, with five installers from Omaha and Lincoln. Mike Sima from Midtown Tile in Papillion, Neb., took the test at Sunderland Brothers Company. Sima said the best thing about the experience was “the information and the education…Learning is a huge part of this industry.”

Sark Tile, Sunderland Brothers Company, Florida Tile, Bostik, and Dan Hecox donated material for both events. LATICRETE provided refreshments for the event at Sunderland Brothers Company. Hecox extended special thanks to Bart Bettiga, Scott Carothers, Sark Tile owner Mark Becher, Sark Tile operations manager Serina Buchanan, Sunderland Brothers Company trade accounts manager Mat Pruitt, and Sunderland Brothers Company operations manager Erin Bergevin.

Manuel Eagan, and Kelly Krueger of Rainwood Interiors (owner); Brian Annoye, Jurassic Tile & Stone, Craig Harimon, Craig Harimon Tile Setters, all took the CTI test at Sunderland Brothers Company in Omaha, Neb., in August.

Manuel Eagan, and Kelly Krueger of Rainwood Interiors (owner); Brian Annoye, Jurassic Tile & Stone, Craig Harimon, Craig Harimon Tile Setters, all took the CTI test at Sunderland Brothers Company in Omaha, Neb., in August.

Business Tip – November 2016

mapei_sponsorFalling forward – winning success from failure

By Marilyn Tam

“I have self-doubt. I have insecurity. I have fear of failure. I have nights when I show up at the arena and I’m like, ‘My back hurts, my feet hurt, my knees hurt. I don’t have it. I just want to chill.’ We all have self-doubt. You don’t deny it, but you also don’t capitulate to it. You embrace it.” – Kobe Bryant

marilyn-tamPatty doesn’t just walk into a room, she takes it over. She stands tall, speaks with confidence and is always well dressed. She is friendly with everyone and remembers each person’s areas of interests and birthday. Is she actually good at her job? No one questioned it; all her colleagues assumed that she must be. Until one day she failed. Her division came in under plan for the year while all the other divisions surpassed plan in both profit and gross sales. Yet in the annual review and promotions process, Patty was one of the two people promoted. Falling forward, that’s Patty.

Do you know of someone like Patty? I worked with Patty early in my career and the lessons she taught me by example have been valuable ever since. Instead of fearing failure, she behaved as if success is hers to claim. She dove into new possibilities, took risks and came out of failure with innovative ideas on how to improve. Here are the key points that I gained from observing her on how to fall forward instead of down:

Be prepared – Patty came to work each day fully mentally and physically ready to shine. Confident, well groomed and happy to engage.

Be interested in others – you can learn from others, help them, have fun and gain a supportive network in the process.

Stretch – Say yes to the new assignment/project and then learn how to do to it. You can only improve if you take on new projects. Seek help and ask questions.

Don’t be afraid to fail – the fear of failure can hold you back from taking the risks that can advance your goals. Not trying is a recipe for guaranteed mediocrity in the long run because you can only advance if you move from where you are now. However, be aware that there is always potential for missing the mark, so prepare contingency plans in case they are needed.

Admit your mistakes – learn from them and use the insights to help you improve. The sooner you deal with what didn’t go as planned, the faster you can analyze what happened and use the new understanding to leverage the current situation to make things better.

Many people live life based on avoiding making mistakes. They are afraid of falling down, but actually you can fall forward! Patty is a great example of how you can turn seeming flops into winners. Greet each day as another opportunity to grow, improve and have fun. With a mind open to looking for possibilities for the good, you are already ahead in the game. In this autumn season, also known commonly as the fall season, dare to reach for more. You won’t fall down, you can fall forward!
Personal disclosure: I included some of the highlights of what I learned from Patty into my first book, How to Use What You’ve Got to Get What You Want. May you too gain from her shining example.

“I’ve come to believe that all my past failures and frustrations were actually laying the foundation for the understandings that have created the new level of living I now enjoy.” – Tony Robbins

––––––––––

Marilyn Tam is an international selling author, speaker, entrepreneur, humanitarian and former CEO of Aveda, president of Reebok Apparel Products & Retail Group and vp of Nike and the founder and executive director of Us Foundation. She is a regular blogger on Huffington Post. Get free gifts and insights and find out about Marilyn Tam on her website, www.marilyntam.com/books.html or connect with her on Facebook. Her latest book, The Happiness Choice shows how you can live a life of happiness, health and success. It’s her way of giving back to the world for all the blessings she’s received. The Happiness Choice tells the stories and insights from Marilyn and many experts, including Jack Canfield, Joan Borysenko, Harville Hendrix, Arielle Ford and others, on how to live the life of your dreams. The book was ranked #3 top business book, and won the Silver Medal in the Global eBook Awards.

1 2 3 25